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Add another search criteria

By using "Add another search criteria" button, it is possible to search up to a total of 5 search criteria. More than one (1) searchable field and criteria makes this search more complex as it allows you to build a more advanced search.

You can also combine several search criteria using Boolean operators [OR, AND, NOT].

For more flexibility, your query can also include wildcards like an asterisk [*] for a string of characters or an interrogation question mark [?] for a single character.

You can further search for a category of trademark, a type of trademark, a grouping of status and further refine your search using Office Action Dates to minimize a given date range using the "Additional Search Options".

See the Additional Search Options section for more "searchable fields".

Combining queries

A search can consist of several text terms to form a criteria in the "search text" field in 5 different criteria search fields. You can do this type of search through the use of Boolean operators (OR, AND, NOT) to combine several criteria, refine a search, and obtain more specific or relevant results.

The operator OR ensures that at least one of the search criteria is present in the resulting documents. The operator AND ensures that both search criteria are present in the resulting documents. Finally, the operator NOT is used to exclude specific criteria from a query.

A search criteria can consist of more than one alpha search term or more than one numeral search term in the same "text field". This is done by using operators [OR], [AND], [NOT] to separate each search terms or/and search fields or/and search criteria, to combine multiple queries.

The operator [OR] ensures that at least one of the search criteria is present in the resulting documents.

Example: using one (1) search criteria the query "red OR apple" in trademark description will locate all documents containing at least one of these words is in the selected search field(s).

This is the same as:

Example: using two (2) search criteria the query red in trademark description "OR" apple in trademark description will locate all documents containing at least one of these words in the selected search field(s).

The operator [AND] ensures that both search criteria are present in the resulting documents.

Example: using one (1) search criteria the query "red AND apple" will locate documents containing both terms in the selected search field(s).

This is the same as:

Example: using two (2) search criteria the query red in trademark description "AND" apple in trademark description will locate documents containing both terms in the selected search field(s).

The operator [NOT] is used to exclude specific criteria from a query.

Example: using one (1) search criteria the query "red NOT apple" will locate documents that contain the word "red" but will exclude all documents containing the word "apple" in the selected search field(s).

This is the same as:

Example: using two (2) search criteria the query red in trademark description NOT apple in trademark description will locate documents that contain the word "red" but will exclude all documents containing the word "apple" in the selected search field(s).

Upper/Lower case letters, accents and special characters

The search engine is case and accent insensitive. You can search any of the following in all of the "text search fields" for any of the search fields within the search criteria:

Upper: A B C D… Z

Lower: a b c d… z

Accents: Ä Å À Â Ã Ä à á ä â ã å È É Ê Ë é è ë Ï Î Í Ì Ï ï î ì ï Ñ ñ Õ Ò Ó Ô ô ö ó ò Ù Ú û ú Ÿ Ž

Example: a search for the word "ete" would find the words "été", "ETE" OR "ÉTÉ"

The search engine is programmed to ignore the below punctuation or typographical marks, when searching in trademark text field, or any of the search fields requiring text. When searching it is best to use TM Lookup search field, as these punctuation marks are replaced by a space.

/. ' … " " ; : ! () { } [ ] -  « » < > − \

Example: a search for the word on-line would find the words "online", "on-line", "ON-LINE", "On-Line", "Online" and "ON LINE"

Special characters or symbols in a trademark name when searching "Trademarks", can also be searched in "TM Lookup". If your special character is part of the searched term, it is recommended to place the term between double quotation marks or when the search term has a specified sequential order.

& @ $ % ^ +   ± −   # ~ |  µ © ¼ ¾ ½ ¢ — ÷    º 

Example: a search for @.com would find the terms "@.COM", "@. Com", or "@.com"

Example: a search for the ¢ symbol would find the trademarks ¢, ¢ DESIGN, 99¢

Same for a search with the $ symbol would find the trademarks $, $ DESIGN, $100

Example: a search for the µ character would find the trademarks µ, µ & DESIGN or µ-WORD.

Example: a search for the ~ symbol in a sentence between double quotation marks, would find the trademarks "WORD~WORD", "WORDS~WORDS", "FRENCH~ENGLISH" or "WORD ~ SENTENCE"

Truncation and wildcard characters

Beware of the wildcard special character searches.

"?" interrogation mark, "*" asterisk

If these characters are part of your trademark or TM Lookup search term it is recommended to search these characters between double quotation marks, otherwise this will be interpreted as wild cards.

Truncation and wildcard characters add flexibility to your searches. The search engine is designed to recognize the asterisk (*) and the interrogation mark (?) as wildcard indicators. You can use these special characters to broaden your searches using either the multiple or single character wildcard.

Wildcards are useful for searching truncation and word stems.

Multiple character wildcard

Substitute (*) for a sequence of zero or more characters.

Example: use pharm* to search for pharmacy, pharmacies, pharmaceutical and pharmaceuticals

Example: use farm* to retrieve farm, farming, farmers, or farms, etc...

Single character wildcard

Substitute (?) for a single wildcard character

Example: search "organi?ation" will match different spellings: "organization" or "organisation".

Example: search "ca?h" will match special characters, symbols: "ca$h" or "cash"

Example: search "S ?00" will match numerical characters: "S 100" or "S 200"

Wildcards in multiple terms

Wildcards can be used in multiple search terms

Example: Cana* Gov* can return results that contain "Canada", "Canadian", "Canary Island with Government", "Governor" or "Governance", etc..

Wildcards in front of characters string

Wildcards can also be used in front of a character string.

Example alpha string: *national will match different terms such as "national" or " international".

Example: *toon will match different terms such as: "platoon", "cartoon", "saskatoon"…

Example numerical character string: *1000 in application numbers will match all application numbers ending with 1000 i.e.: 2061000, 2051000, 2041000, etc…

Using this search method may not perform as well as if you were searching with a character string followed by a wildcard character.

The use of quotation marks

This search strategy is important when you are searching for multiple terms, such as names, slogans, sentences and want results that will keep precise order of words, characters, search terms or a combination of these. They include:

  • unique trademarks comprising multiple terms with punctuation, special characters, or numerical characters
  • unique owner names comprising specific spelling and punctuation, or abbreviations
  • unique search terms utilizing special characters such as wildcard within search string
  • unique terms found in any text fields

If the search term is between double quotation mark, the search engine will return results containing the exact order of the searched term string.

Example: use " " to search for "A.P. LTD" as a name search, to return current, old owners, registrants or applicants with that exact abbreviated name using punctuation.

Example: use " " to search for "L'@CCÈS" in trademarks name, to return trademarks with that exact term using a special character.

Example: use " " to search for "GOT GAME ?"or "DO*YOU*SEE*ME*NOW" to return trademarks with that exact order of terms using interrogation mark and asterisk characters.