Federal Economic Development Agency for Northern Ontario 2022–23
Departmental Plan

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The Honourable Patty Hajdu, P.C., M.P.
Minister of Indigenous Services and Minister responsible for the Federal Economic Development Agency for Northern Ontario

To obtain a copy of this publication, or to receive it in an alternate format (Braille, large print, etc.), please contact:

FedNor Communications
Federal Economic Development Agency for Northern Ontario
19 Lisgar Street
Suite 307
Sudbury, ON  P3E 3L4
Canada

Telephone (toll-free in Canada): 1-877-333-6673
TTY (for hearing impaired): 1-866-694-8389
Business hours: 8:30 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. (Eastern Time)
Email: fednormediarelations-relationsaveclesmediasfednor@ised-isde.gc.ca

Permission to Reproduce

Except as otherwise specifically noted, the information in this publication may be reproduced, in part or in whole and by any means, without charge or further permission from Federal Economic Development Agency for Northern Ontario, provided that due diligence is exercised in ensuring the accuracy of the information reproduced; that Federal Economic Development Agency for Northern Ontario is identified as the source institution; and that the reproduction is not represented as an official version of the information reproduced or as having been made in affiliation with, or with the endorsement of, Federal Economic Development Agency for Northern Ontario.

For permission to reproduce the information in this publication for commercial purposes, please contact FedNor Communications mentioned above.

© Her Majesty the Queen in Right of Canada, as represented by the Minister of Indigenous Services and Minister responsible for the Federal Economic Development Agency for Northern Ontario, 2022.

Cat. No. Iu91-1/2E-PDF

ISSN 2816-279X

Aussi offert en français sous le titre Rapport sur les plans ministériels 2022-2023.

Table of contents


From the Minister

Photo of The Honourable Patty Hajdu, MP

Now a standalone Regional Development Agency (RDA) the Federal Economic Development Agency for Northern Ontario (FedNor) will build on its decades-long legacy by working to strengthen the resilience of communities across the region, and by promoting job creation and an inclusive, innovative and sustainable economy with pathways of economic opportunity for all.

Through its various offerings, FedNor works with stakeholders including businesses, community development partners, the province and municipalities to foster growth in key sectors of Northern Ontario’s economy. Notably, the organization is focused on advancing innovation and commercialization, promoting the transition to a green economy, and supporting business growth and productivity, including through the adoption and adaptation of technology and market expansion. By focusing on these and other key priorities, FedNor is helping businesses and communities recover and emerge more resilient than ever from the COVID-19 pandemic while improving the quality of jobs and creating the jobs of tomorrow.

In the coming year, FedNor will prioritize the delivery of support to small and medium-sized businesses and key sectors that continue to recover from the impacts of the pandemic. This includes support for the tourism sector, regional air transportation and aerospace, among others. In addition to delivering recovery initiatives, FedNor will continue to promote short- and long-term job creation through the delivery of its regionally tailored programs, services and expertise, ensuring all corners of the region have access to place-based programming support.

FedNor will also seek to support the economic participation of underrepresented groups including women, Indigenous peoples, young entrepreneurs, Black Canadians, as well as Official Languages Minority Communities across the region to further strengthen the innovation and diversity of Northern Ontario’s economy.

FedNor will continue to build on the Government of Canada’s Prosperity and Growth Strategy for Northern Ontario through focussed engagement with municipalities and Indigenous communities on economic development opportunities, and drive investments to support the innovative growth and recovery of critical sectors to the regional economy such as mining and tourism.

As we continue to build a stronger, more sustainable Northern Ontario, FedNor will maintain its close collaboration with partner Community Futures Development Corporations, as well as its counterpart Regional Development Agencies across Canada, to deliver relevant, responsive and timely programming that is tailored to the needs of the region.

Together with Canadians of all backgrounds and stakeholders across Northern Ontario, we are building a globally competitive, sustainable and environmentally sound economy that will benefit generations to come.

It is my pleasure to present the 2022–23 Departmental Plan for FedNor.


Plans at a glance

The Federal Economic Development Agency for Northern Ontario (FedNor) was established on August 12, 2021, to strengthen the economic development of Northern Ontario. The Agency was previously positioned as an initiative under Innovation, Science and Economic Development Canada (ISED) and was formed in 1987 to: promote economic development in areas of low income and slow economic growth; emphasize long-term economic development and sustainable employment and income creation; and focus on small- and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) and the development of entrepreneurial talent.

Northern Ontario’s economy has historically been concentrated in primary industries, such as mining and forestry, making it highly susceptible to global economic cycles and contributing to economic growth that has traditionally been slower than Ontario and Canada. The region’s economic opportunity lies in: the rising demand for natural resources that can be responsibly sourced from Northern Ontario, including precious and base metals, wood products, biofuel and critical minerals; renewed interest in the forestry sector, particularly for paper products and lumber; and competitive land price advantage along with more than one million acres of unused agricultural land and longer growing seasons.

The impact of the COVID-19 pandemic has been uneven across Northern Ontario’s communities and businesses. The region has seen a lower rebound in total employment when compared to the rest of Ontario and annual employment has dropped significantly year over year since the start of the COVID-19 pandemic. Communities and businesses that are largely dependent on tourism were heavily impacted by the implementation of public health measures at the Canada-United States border and travel restrictions. However, communities where there is a high reliance on mining, and quarrying were less severely impacted as businesses in this sector were able to largely continue operations under public health guidelines.

While continuing to support the region through the COVID-19 pandemic and positioning it for a strong economic recovery, FedNor will also continue its transition to a standalone Regional Development Agency (RDA).

Over the course of 2022-23, FedNor will focus its efforts on the following priorities:

Encourage the economic diversification and resilience of communities

As communities continue to deal with the impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic, FedNor will provide targeted support to mitigate negative effects and help communities plan for, and implement, economic recovery efforts. Core programmingEndnote i will support economic diversification in communities where economic activity is concentrated in a single area (such as mining, forestry, or tourism) and take advantage of new sectors and markets, with a focus on supporting sustainable and environmentally friendly activities.

Through strategic investments and outreach activities, FedNor will continue its efforts to increase the participation of traditionally underrepresented groups in the Northern Ontario economy, including Indigenous peoples, members of Official Language Minority Communities (OLMCs), Black people and other racialized groups, persons with disabilities, newcomers to Canada, women, youth and LGBTQ2+ individuals.

FedNor will continue to work with the Community Futures Development Corporations (CFDC) to support diversification and competitiveness in local rural economies.

Strengthen support to businesses

SMEs are the backbone of Northern Ontario’s economy and their growth provides opportunities for the entire region. It is essential for the region and all of its communities that SMEs are supported through the pandemic and well positioned for recovery. FedNor aims to increase the participation of systemically marginalized groups in the innovation economy to support the development of a diverse, skilled, and educated labour force that enables SMEs to grow and scale-up. FedNor will continue to seek pathways towards providing wrap around services and strengthening network resources to support businesses owned by underrepresented groups to overcome barriers and increase the inclusivity and diversity of Northern Ontario’s business landscape. In addition to using core programming Endnote ii to support business development and expansion, as well as entrepreneurship, FedNor will deliver targeted initiatives to support struggling businesses to encourage the creation of jobs, as well as clean and inclusive growth.

Foster innovation

FedNor will work with stakeholders to expand and strengthen regional innovation ecosystems and clusters. Along with project funding, FedNor will play a convenor role to reinforce linkages between government programs and innovative firms.

Stand-up the FedNor Agency

FedNor will continue to establish itself as a full-fledged RDA by developing additional capacity to fulfill its new responsibilities. As it will experience significant organizational change in 2022-23, FedNor will prioritize change management, adoption of streamlined work processes and the creation and maintenance of a healthy and inclusive work environment.

Throughout all of these activities, FedNor will make efforts to support equity, diversity and inclusivity, and encourage clean and sustainable development.

For more information on FedNor’s plans, see the “Core responsibilities: planned results and resources, and key risks” section of this plan.


Core responsibilities: planned results and resources, and key risks

This section contains information on the department’s planned results and resources for each of its core responsibilities. It also contains information on key risks related to achieving those results.

Economic Development in Northern Ontario

Description

FedNor promotes an innovative, diversified and inclusive Northern Ontario economy through investments in regional growth, including commercialization and adoption of technologies, as well as community economic diversification.

Planning highlights

In 2022-23, FedNor will support the delivery of the Government’s priorities, tailored to the unique challenges and opportunities of Northern Ontario. As an Agency, FedNor will act as a convenor and champion for the region.

Departmental Result: Communities are economically diversified in Northern Ontario

Northern Ontario’s dependence on primary industries leaves its communities and businesses open to boom-and-bust cycles driven by factors well beyond its control. Diversifying local and regional economies is necessary for Northern Ontario’s long-term sustainability. Additionally, many of the region’s smaller communities are to some extent dependent on the tourism industry, which was decimated by the COVID-19 pandemic.

Through the Northern Ontario Development Program (NODP), FedNor will continue to invest in projects led by municipalities, First Nations, and other organizations and institutions that support community economic development, diversification, job creation and self-reliant communities in Northern Ontario. The Agency will fund projects that promote the development of small and rural businesses and help create and maintain skilled jobs in communities and create the conditions necessary for innovative businesses to remain anchored in these communities as they grow.

FedNor is committed to continue working with partners and stakeholders to build strong and economically sustainable communities with a high quality of life for residents. The Agency supports the capacity of small, rural and Indigenous communities to participate in economic opportunities by funding community economic development functions, like research and planning and small-scale economic infrastructure. The Agency will support the growth and expansion of businesses through training opportunities and flexible contribution programs that build capacity for businesses and communities.

In 2022-23, FedNor will continue to support the 24 Community Futures Development Corporations (CFDCs) located in Northern Ontario. These community-based, not-for-profit organizations are staffed by professionals and are governed by local volunteer boards of directors familiar with their community’s needs, concerns and development plans. CFDCs offer a wide variety of programs and services supporting community economic development and small business growth. The Agency will continue to work collaboratively with CFDCs, their regional networks and the provincial association, through activities such as: outreach/liaison; capacity building; program and policy development; referrals; compliance monitoring in regard to contribution agreements; and other collaborative activities.

National programs like the Community Futures Program (CFP) target economic development in rural areas through the network CFDCs. Through the CFP, FedNor and the CFDCs will help communities attract, develop and retain innovative businesses to become anchor firms in their communities.

Francophone communities are important for the overall economic well-being of Northern Ontario. To encourage growth in Northern Ontario's Francophone communities, FedNor makes funding available for activities related to business and economic development. In 2022-23, the Agency will continue to provide targeted support for Official Language Minority Communities (OLMCs) in Northern Ontario through the Government of Canada’s Economic Development Initiative for OLMCs (EDI). FedNor will collaborate with its partners and engage key stakeholders over the next fiscal year, regarding economic development and business growth to ensure investments respond to the needs of the OLMCs in Northern Ontario.

The COVID-19 pandemic has also significantly impacted the Canadian air and transport industries. The Government is committed to helping regional airports mitigate financial impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic. In 2022-23, the Agency will continue to support regional air and transport industries through the Regional Air Transportation Initiative (RATI). RATI aims to help regional air transportation ecosystems affected by the economic impacts of COVID-19 by enabling SMEs in the regional ecosystem to remain operational through these difficult times and continue to support the economic growth of the region.

Additional support will be directed at the tourism industry in the form of the Tourism Relief Fund (TRF). The TRF provides funding to tourism businesses and organizations to adapt their products and services, pivot their business models to take advantage of domestic markets, and plan for recovery.

Finally, FedNor will help communities improve public spaces and stimulate local economies through the delivery of the Canada Community Revitalization Fund (CCRF). Through this initiative, communities will be able to build or improve community infrastructure assets to help them recover from the pandemic.

Departmental Result: Businesses are innovative and growing in Northern Ontario

Driving economic growth includes fostering an inclusive business landscape. Ensuring businesses in Northern Ontario can recover from the impacts of the pandemic, as well as grow, helps to build a stronger and resilient economy for Northern Ontario’s communities.

The RDAs, including FedNor, deliver the Regional Economic Growth through Innovation program (REGI), which is tailored to the unique realities of each region. REGI is the main tool that FedNor uses to support businesses to increase their competitiveness, adopt technologies and increase their productivity. The RDAs are one of the government’s four flagship platforms that support business innovation. The RDAs work with the National Research Council of Canada (NRCC), the Canadian Trade Commissioner Service (TCS) and Innovation Canada to support Canadian businesses at all stages of the innovation and commercialization continuum.

In 2022-23, FedNor aims to advance the region's economy, encourage collaborative ventures, and promote the benefits of investing in the region. The Agency will maintain investments in key areas, such as direct-to-business support through the Business Scale-up and Productivity (BSP) stream, to help firms expand and create impactful jobs, commercialize new products and services, enter new markets and invest in technology that increases their productivity.

As a result of the COVID-19 pandemic, Northern Ontario has seen a year-over-year decrease in annual employment since the start of the pandemic. In support of SMEs and the creation of jobs, FedNor is delivering the Jobs and Growth Fund (JGF), which will help SMEs future-proof their businesses, build resiliency and transition to a green economy.

The Aerospace Regional Recovery Initiative (ARRI) complements the support provided to the aerospace industry through Canada's COVID-19 Economic Response PlanEndnote iii. ARRI is focused on helping SMEs green their operations, improve productivity and strengthen their productivity, while furthering integration into regional and global supply chains.

FedNor will continue to work closely with the other RDAs and with Innovation, Science and Economic Development (ISED) to strengthen business and entrepreneurial support for underrepresented groups, which will include addressing funding gaps, building capacity and creating more inclusive entrepreneurship ecosystems. In 2022-23, the RDAs will deliver the Black Entrepreneurship Program (BEP) National Ecosystem Fund to strengthen capacity among Black-led not-for-profit business organizations. Additionally, FedNor and the RDAs will continue to deliver the Women Entrepreneurship Strategy’s (WES) Ecosystem Fund in support of women entrepreneurs to start and grow their businesses.

Departmental Result: Businesses invest in the development and commercialization of innovative technologies in Northern Ontario

Canada relies on strong innovation to create economic opportunities across the country. FedNor will work to foster conditions that will encourage long-term economic growth for Northern communities.

Developing strong, dynamic and inclusive regional innovation ecosystems is essential for Canada. FedNor will collaborate with its partners and engage key stakeholders in discussions regarding economic development and business growth to ensure that the Agency’s investments respond to the changing needs of businesses. Key partners and stakeholders may include other levels of government, community leaders, financial institutions, industry associations and private-sector organizations.

Through REGI’s Regional Innovation Ecosystem (RIE) stream, the Agency will support ecosystem catalysts, including business incubators and accelerators, and invest in projects that support recovery, regional competitiveness and the growth of strategic clusters.

United Nations’ (UN) 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development and the UN Sustainable Development Goals

FedNor’s mandate to build a stronger and more resilient Northern Ontario supports Canada’s efforts to implement the UN’s 2030 Agenda and the Sustainable Development Goals (SDG). Specifically, FedNor’s activities contribute to SDG 8 to “promote sustained, inclusive and sustainable economic growth, full and productive employment and decent work for all” and SDG 9 to “build resilient infrastructure, promote inclusive and sustainable industrialization and foster innovation.”

Through the NODP, FedNor supports community economic development and planning projects in urban, rural and remote communities, which contributes to the advancement of SDG 11 to “make cities and human settlements inclusive, safe, resilient and sustainable”.

In partnership with ISED, FedNor and the other RDAs deliver the WES Ecosystem Fund and the BEP. These programs support business owners and entrepreneurs from underrepresented groups to grow their businesses. Through delivery of these programs, FedNor also contributes to SDG 5 to “achieve gender equality and empower all women and girls” and SDG 10 to “reduce inequality within and among countries.”

Experimentation

FedNor does not plan to conduct any experiments during 2022-23. Efforts will be focused on: standing-up the Agency and managing organizational change; enhancing client service delivery, in terms of delivering programs, implementing a new Grants and Contributions Program Management business system, and gathering socio-economic data.

Key risk(s)

Risk 1: Impacts of the COVID-19 Pandemic on Program Delivery

With continued public health restrictions in place due to the COVID-19 pandemic, businesses and organizations who received relief support in the previous two years may not be able to contribute sufficient funds or complete projects according to the original timeline due to resourcing issues, purchasing delays, and potentially lasting effects of the COVID-19 pandemic on resourcing or supply chains.

To mitigate this risk, FedNor has established internal, collaborative processes on new initiatives where Program Delivery staff can engage funding recipients to work on solutions at the earliest possible time.

Risk 2: Organizational transformation and change management

There is a risk that the transformation required to take FedNor from an initiative to a RDA could put enormous pressure on the organisation, negatively impacting current employees and impeding the progress toward RDA status.

To mitigate this, FedNor’s management has established a new governance, and begun to systematically put in place the required structures, processes and plans to ensure as best a transition as possible.

Planned results for Economic Development in Northern Ontario

The following table (Table 1) shows the planned results for Economic Development in Northern Ontario, the result indicators, the targets and the target dates for 2022–23, and the actual results for the three most recent fiscal years for which actual results are available.

Table 1 Planned results for Economic Development in Northern Ontario

Planned results for Economic Development in Northern Ontario
Departmental result Departmental result indicator Target Date to achieve target 2018–19
actual result
2019–20 actual result 2020–21 actual result
Communities are economically diversified in Northern Ontario Percentage of SMEs that are majority-owned by Indigenous people in Northern Ontario 3.8% Footnote 1 March 31, 2023 3.6% (2017) Not available Footnote 2 Not available Footnote 2
Percentage of SMEs that are majority-owned by youth in Northern Ontario 13.0% Footnote 1 March 31, 2023 12.8% (2017) Not available Footnote 2 Not available Footnote 2
Percentage of SMEs that are majority-owned by women in Northern Ontario 17.2% Footnote 1 March 31, 2023 17.0% (2017) Not available Footnote 2 Not available Footnote 2
Percentage of SMEs that are majority-owned by visible minorities in Northern Ontario 2.8% Footnote 1 March 31, 2023 2.6% (2017) Not available Footnote 2 Not available Footnote 2
Percentage of SMEs that are majority-owned by persons with disabilities in Northern Ontario 0.8% Footnote 1 March 31, 2023 0.8% (2017) Not available Footnote 2 Not available Footnote 2
Amount leveraged per dollar invested by FedNor in projects 1.80 March 31, 2023 1.65 1.68 1.90
Percentage of professional, science and technology-related jobs in Northern Ontario 29.5% Footnote 1 March 31, 2023 27.6% (2016) Footnote 3 27.3% (2017) Footnote 3 29.1% (2018) Footnote 3
Businesses invest in the development and commercialization of innovative technologies in Northern Ontario Value of BERD by firms receiving FedNor program funding (in dollars)

FedNor: Not available Footnote 6

Northern Ontario: $8,000,000
March 31, 2023

FedNor value supressed. Footnote 4

Northern Ontario total $10,103,330 (2014) Footnote 3
FedNor value supressed. Footnote 4  Northern Ontario total $11,226,678  (2015) Footnote 3 FedNor value supressed. Footnote 4
Northern Ontario total $8,503,000 (2016) Footnote 3
Percentage of companies engaged in collaborations with higher education institutions in Northern Ontario Footnote 5 Not available March 31, 2023 Not available Footnote 2 Not available Footnote 2 Not available Footnote 2
Businesses are innovative and growing in Northern Ontario Revenue growth rate of firms supported by FedNor programs 4% March 31, 2023 FedNor value 6.3%. Northern Ontario total 7.8%. (2015) Footnote 3 FedNor value supressed.Footnote 4
Northern Ontario total -8.6%. (2016) Footnote 3
FedNor value supressed.Footnote 4
Northern Ontario total 4.5%. (2017) Footnote 3
Number of high-growth firms in Northern Ontario 200 March 31, 2023 300 (2014) Footnote 3 250 (2015) Footnote 3 200 (2016) Footnote 3
Value of exports of goods (in dollars) from Northern Ontario $8,100,000 Footnote 1 March 31, 2023 7,696,863 (2015) Footnote 3 7,427,377 (2016) Footnote 3 8,088,730 (2017) Footnote 3
Value of exports of clean technologies (in dollars) from Northern Ontario Not available March 31, 2023 Not available Footnote 2 Not available Footnote 2 Not available Footnote 2

The financial, human resources and performance information for the FedNor’s program inventory is available on GC InfoBaseEndnote iv.

Planned budgetary spending for Economic Development in Northern Ontario (dollars)

The following table (Table 2) shows, for Economic Development in Northern Ontario, budgetary spending for 2022–23, as well as planned spending for that year and for each of the next two fiscal years.

Table 2 Planned budgetary spending for Economic Development in Northern Ontario (dollars)

2022–23 budgetary spending (as indicated in Main Estimates) 2022–23 planned spending 2023–24 planned spending 2024–25 planned spending
123,822,898 123,822,898 57,533,891 48,344,148

Financial, human resources and performance information for FedNor’s program inventory is available on GC InfoBaseEndnote v.

Planned human resources for Economic Development in Northern Ontario

The following table (Table 3) shows, in full-time equivalents, the human resources the department will need to fulfill this core responsibility for 2022–23 and for each of the next two fiscal years.

Table 3 Planned human resources for Economic Development in Northern Ontario (full-time equivalents)

Table 3 Planned human resources for Economic Development in Northern Ontario (full-time equivalents)
2022–23 planned full-time equivalents 2023–24 planned full-time equivalents 2024–25 planned full-time equivalents
87 77 76

Financial, human resources and performance information for FedNor’s program inventory is available on GC InfoBaseEndnote vi.


Internal services: planned results

Description

Internal Services are comprised of those groups of related activities and resources that the federal government considers to be services in support of programs and/or required to meet corporate obligations of an organization. Internal Services refers to the activities and resources of the 10 distinct services that support program delivery in the organization, regardless of the Internal Services delivery model in a department. These services are:

  • Management and Oversight Services
  • Communications Services
  • Legal Services
  • Human Resources Management Services
  • Financial Management Services
  • Information Management Services
  • Information Technology Services
  • Real Property Management Services
  • Materiel Management Services
  • Acquisition Management Services

Planning highlights

In 2022-23, FedNor will continue to foster an agile, equipped and inclusive workforce, focusing on well-being throughout the changes incurred as part of the shift to remote working during the pandemic. FedNor will continue to work with ISED on its transition to a standalone department as well as in the establishment of its new governance structure and associated resources to meet its new legislative responsibilities and accountabilities.

FedNor is committed to strengthening and improving its client facing experience and to expand efficiencies in the delivery of its programs and build upon its excellence.

Specifically, FedNor will:

  1. Introduce and implement a new integrated software solution that will be used to manage grants and contribution (G&C) programs and client relationships. The Grant and Contributions Program Management (GCPM) system will create efficiencies and provide reporting capabilities at the project, client and program levels. Attributes include an online portal to submit applications, claims and digitized data collection to enhance user experience and execution excellence.
  2. An update of the FedNor website, including a secure client portal. Completely redesigned with user needs in mind, the site will make it easier for our current and potential customers to find the information and services they are looking for.
  3. Plan and prepare for the safe and healthy return of employees to physical occupancy, including implementing mitigation measures to address associated risks with required protocols, equipment, tools, and support.

Planned budgetary spending for internal services (dollars)

The following table (Table 4) shows, for internal services, budgetary spending for 2022–23, as well as planned spending for that year and for each of the next two fiscal years.

Table 4 Planned budgetary spending for internal services (dollars)

Table 4 Planned budgetary spending for internal services (dollars)
2022–23 budgetary spending (as indicated in Main Estimates) 2022–23 planned spending 2023–24 planned spending 2024–25 planned spending
1,165,877 1,165,877 2,819,094 2,830,948

Planned human resources for internal services (dollars)

The following table (Table 5 ) shows, in full-time equivalents, the human resources the department will need to carry out its internal services for 2022–23 and for each of the next two fiscal years.

Table 5 Planned human resources for internal services (full-time equivalents)

Table 5 Planned human resources for internal services (full-time equivalents)
2022–23 planned full-time equivalents 2023–24 planned full-time equivalents 2024–25 planned full-time equivalents
15 15 15

Planned spending and human resources

This section provides an overview of the department’s planned spending and human resources for the next three fiscal years and compares planned spending for 2022–23 with actual spending for the current year and the previous year.

Planned spending

Departmental spending 2019–20 to 2024–25

The following graph (Figure 1) presents planned spending (voted and statutory expenditures) over time.

Figure 1 Departmental spending trend graph (dollars)
  2019-20 2020-21 2021-22 2022-23 2023-24 2024-25
Statutory 0 0 183,643 1,623,946 1,467,982 1,387,351
Voted 0 0 93,369,170 122,198,952 56,065,909 46,956,797
Total 0 0 93,552,813 123,822,898 57,533,891 48,344,148

FedNor became a standalone Agency effective August 12, 2021. Actual expenditures from  2019-20 and 2020-21 as well as from April 1, 2021 to August 12, 2021 are reflected in ISED’s 2021-22 Departmental PlanEndnote vii. Therefore, there is no historical information for a comparative analysis.

FedNor received significant temporary grants and contribution funding in response to COVID-19 and for the delivery of recovery initiatives as announced in Budget 2021, which accounts for the majority of the budget decrease beginning in 2023-24.

Planned human resources

The following table shows information on human resources, in full-time equivalents (FTEs), for each of FedNor’s core responsibilities and for its internal services for 2022–23 and the other relevant years.

Human resources planning summary for core responsibilities and internal services
Table 7 Human resources planning summary (full-time equivalents)
Table 7 Human resources planning summary (full-time equivalents)
Core responsibilities and internal services 2019–20 actual full time equivalents 2020–21 actual full time equivalents 2021–22 forecast full time equivalents 2022–23 planned full time equivalents 2023–24 planned full time equivalents 2024–25 planned full time equivalents
Economic Development in Northern Ontario Nil Nil 73 87 77 76
Subtotal Nil Nil 73 87 77 76
Internal services Nil Nil 12 15 15 15
Total Nil Nil 85 102 92 91

FedNor became a standalone Agency effective August 12, 2021. Full-time equivalents from 2019-20 and 2020-21 as well as from April 1, 2021 to August 12, 2021 are reflected in ISED’s 2021-22 Departmental PlanEndnote viii. Therefore, there is no historical information for a comparative analysis. Due to temporary program funding, human resources levels show an increase starting in 2022-23.

Estimates by vote

Information on FedNor’s organizational appropriations is available in the 2022–23 Main EstimatesEndnote ix.

Future-oriented condensed statement of operations

The future-oriented condensed statement of operations provides an overview of FedNor’s operations for 2021–22 to 2022–23.

The forecast and planned amounts in this statement of operations were prepared on an accrual basis. The forecast and planned amounts presented in other sections of the Departmental Plan were prepared on an expenditure basis. Amounts may therefore differ.

A more detailed future-oriented statement of operations and associated notes, including a reconciliation of the net cost of operations with the requested authorities, are available on FedNor’s websiteEndnote x.

Future-oriented condensed statement of operations for the year ending March 31, 2023 (dollars)

Table 8 Future-oriented condensed statement of operations (dollars)

Financial information 2021–22 forecast results 2022–23 planned results Difference (2022–23 planned results minus 2021–22 forecast results)
Total expenses 83,022,924 111,448,757 28,425,833
Total revenues - - -
Net cost of operations before government funding and transfers 83,022,924 111,448,757 28,425,833

In 2022-23, total net spending is projected to be $111.4 million, up 34% year-over-year. This increase in forecast spending can be primarily attributed  to FedNor becoming a standalone agency as of August 12, 2021. Therefore, planned and forecast results from April 1, 2021 to August 12, 2021 are reflected in ISED's 2021-22 Departmental PlanEndnote xi and associated financial statements.


Corporate information

Organizational profile

Appropriate minister(s):
The Honourable Patty Hajdu
Minister of Indigenous Services and Minister responsible for the Federal Economic Development Agency for Northern Ontario

Institutional head: Manon Brassard

Enabling instrument(s):
Order in Council P.C. 2021-0840Endnote xii dated August 6, 2021, and coming into force on August 12, 2021, (1) transferring from the Department of Industry to the Federal Economic Development Agency for Northern Ontario the control and supervision of that portion of the federal public administration in the Department of Industry known as the Federal Economic Development Initiative for Northern Ontario; and (2) ordering the Minister of Economic Development and Official Languages to preside over the Federal Economic Development Agency for Northern Ontario.

Order in Council P.C. 2021-0841Endnote xiii dated August 6, 2021, and coming into force on August 12, 2021, amending SCHEDULE IV TO THE FINANCIAL ADMINISTRATION ACT by adding Federal Economic Development Agency for Northern Ontario to the Schedule of that Act.

Year of incorporation / commencement: 2021

Other: Originally formed in 1987 as the “Federal Economic Development Initiative for Northern Ontario” as an initiative under Industry Canada (now Innovation, Science and Economic Development Canada).

Raison d’être, mandate and role: who we are and what we do

Information on FedNor’s raison d’être, mandate and role is available on the agency’s websiteEndnote xiv.

Information on FedNor’s mandate letter commitments is available in the Minister’s mandate letterEndnote xv.

Operating context

Information on the operating context is available on FedNor’s websiteEndnote xvi.

Reporting framework

FedNor’s approved departmental results framework and program inventory for 2022–23 are as follows (Table 9).

Table 9 Reporting framework

- Core Responsibility: Economic Development in Northern Ontario -
Departmental Results Framework Departmental Result: Communities are economically diversified in Northern Ontario Indicator: Percentage of SMEs that are majority-owned by Indigenous people in Northern Ontario Internal Services
Indicator: Percentage of SMEs that are majority-owned by youth in Northern Ontario
Indicator: Percentage of SMEs that are majority-owned by women in Northern Ontario
Indicator: Percentage of SMEs that are majority-owned by visible minorities in Northern Ontario
Indicator: Percentage of SMEs that are majority-owned by persons with disabilities in Northern Ontario
Indicator: Amount leveraged per dollar invested by FedNor in projects
Indicator: Percentage of professional, science and technology-related jobs in Northern Ontario
Departmental Result: Businesses invest in the development and commercialization of innovative technologies in Northern Ontario Indicator: Value of Business Enterprise Research and Development (BERD) by firms receiving FedNor program funding (in dollars)
Indicator: Percentage of companies engaged in collaborations with higher education institutions in Northern Ontario
Departmental Result: Businesses are innovative and growing in Northern Ontario Indicator: Revenue growth rate of firms supported by FedNor programs
Indicator: Number of high-growth firms in Northern Ontario
Indicator: Value of exports of goods (in dollars) from Northern Ontario
Indicator: Value of exports of clean technologies (in dollars) from Northern Ontario
Program Inventory Program: Community Economic Development and Diversification
Program: Regional Innovation Ecosystem
Program: Business Development

Supporting information on the program inventory

Supporting information on planned expenditures, human resources, and results related to FedNor’s program inventory is available on GC InfoBaseEndnote xvii.


Supplementary information tables

The following supplementary information tables are available on FedNor’s website:Endnote xviii

  • United Nations 2030 Agenda and the Sustainable Development Goals
  • Reporting on Green Procurement
  • Details on transfer payment programs
  • Gender-based analysis plus

Federal tax expenditures

FedNor’s Departmental Plan does not include information on tax expenditures.

Tax expenditures are the responsibility of the Minister of Finance. The Department of Finance Canada publishes cost estimates and projections for government­wide tax expenditures each year in the Report on Federal Tax ExpendituresEndnote xix. This report provides detailed information on tax expenditures, including objectives, historical background and references to related federal spending programs, as well as evaluations, research papers and gender-based analysis plus.


Organizational contact information

Mailing address
Federal Economic Development Agency for Northern Ontario
19 Lisgar Street, Suite 307
Sudbury, ON  P3E 3L4
Telephone: 1-877-333-6673
TTY: 1-866-694-8389
Fax: 705-671-0717
Website(s): http://fednor.gc.ca


Appendix: definitions

appropriation (crédit)
Any authority of Parliament to pay money out of the Consolidated Revenue Fund.

budgetary expenditures (dépenses budgétaires)
Operating and capital expenditures; transfer payments to other levels of government, organizations or individuals; and payments to Crown corporations.

core responsibility (responsabilité essentielle)
An enduring function or role performed by a department. The intentions of the department with respect to a core responsibility are reflected in one or more related departmental results that the department seeks to contribute to or influence.

Departmental Plan (plan ministériel)
A document that sets out a department’s priorities, programs, expected results and associated resource requirements, covering a three-year period beginning with the year indicated in the title of the report. Departmental Plans are tabled in Parliament each spring.

departmental result (résultat ministériel)
A change that a department seeks to influence. A departmental result is often outside departments’ immediate control, but it should be influenced by program-level outcomes.

departmental result indicator (indicateur de résultat ministériel)
A factor or variable that provides a valid and reliable means to measure or describe progress on a departmental result.

departmental results framework (cadre ministériel des résultats)
A framework that consists of the department’s core responsibilities, departmental results and departmental result indicators.

Departmental Results Report (rapport sur les résultats ministériels)
A report on a department’s actual performance in a fiscal year against its plans, priorities and expected results set out in its Departmental Plan for that year. Departmental Results Reports are usually tabled in Parliament each fall.

experimentation (expérimentation)
The conducting of activities that explore, test and compare the effects and impacts of policies and interventions in order to inform decision-making and improve outcomes for Canadians. Experimentation is related to, but distinct from, innovation. Innovation is the trying of something new; experimentation involves a rigorous comparison of results. For example, introducing a new mobile application to communicate with Canadians can be an innovation; systematically testing the new application and comparing it against an existing website or other tools to see which one reaches more people, is experimentation.

full-time equivalent (équivalent temps plein)
A measure of the extent to which an employee represents a full person-year charge against a departmental budget. Full-time equivalents are calculated as a ratio of assigned hours of work to scheduled hours of work. Scheduled hours of work are set out in collective agreements.

gender-based analysis plus (GBA Plus) (analyse comparative entre les sexes plus [ACS Plus])
An analytical process used to assess how diverse groups of women, men and gender-diverse people experience policies, programs and services based on multiple factors including race, ethnicity, religion, age, and mental or physical disability.

government-wide priorities (priorités pangouvernementales)
For the purpose of the 2022–23 Departmental Plan, government-wide priorities are the high-level themes outlining the government’s agenda in the 2021 Speech from the Throne: protecting Canadians from COVID-19; helping Canadians through the pandemic; building back better – a resiliency agenda for the middle class; the Canada we’re fighting for.

horizontal initiative (initiative horizontale)
An initiative in which two or more federal organizations are given funding to pursue a shared outcome, often linked to a government priority.

non-budgetary expenditures (dépenses non budgétaires)
Net outlays and receipts related to loans, investments and advances, which change the composition of the financial assets of the Government of Canada.

performance (rendement)
What an organization did with its resources to achieve its results, how well those results compare to what the organization intended to achieve, and how well lessons learned have been identified.

plan (plan)
The articulation of strategic choices, which provides information on how an organization intends to achieve its priorities and associated results. Generally, a plan will explain the logic behind the strategies chosen and tend to focus on actions that lead up to the expected result.

planned spending (dépenses prévues)
For Departmental Plans and Departmental Results Reports, planned spending refers to those amounts presented in the Main Estimates.

A department is expected to be aware of the authorities that it has sought and received. The determination of planned spending is a departmental responsibility, and departments must be able to defend the expenditure and accrual numbers presented in their Departmental Plans and Departmental Results Reports.

program (programme)
Individual or groups of services, activities or combinations thereof that are managed together within a department and that focus on a specific set of outputs, outcomes or service levels.

program inventory (répertoire des programmes)
An inventory of a department’s programs that describes how resources are organized to carry out the department’s core responsibilities and achieve its planned results.

result (résultat)
An external consequence attributed, in part, to an organization, policy, program or initiative. Results are not within the control of a single organization, policy, program or initiative; instead, they are within the area of the organization’s influence.

statutory expenditures (dépenses législatives)
Expenditures that Parliament has approved through legislation other than appropriation acts. The legislation sets out the purpose of the expenditures and the terms and conditions under which they may be made.

target (cible)
A measurable performance or success level that an organization, program or initiative plans to achieve within a specified time period. Targets can be either quantitative or qualitative.

voted expenditures (dépenses votées)
Expenditures that Parliament approves annually through an Appropriation Act. The vote wording becomes the governing conditions under which these expenditures may be made.