Innovation, Science and Economic Development's 2021-22 Departmental Sustainable Development Strategy Report

This report on progress supports the commitment in the Federal Sustainable Development Act (FSDA) to make environmental decision-making more transparent and accountable to Parliament. It also contributes to an integrated, whole‑of‑government view of activities supporting environmental sustainability.

The departmental information reported accounts for information previously prepared in accordance with Innovation, Science and Economic Development's 2020 to 2023 Departmental Sustainable Development Strategy. Given commitments in Innovation, Science and Economic Development's 2020-2023 Departmental Sustainable Development Strategy, the below Progress Report includes updates on the following portfolio organizations and regional development agencies: Sustainable Development Technology Canada (SDTC); the Standards Council of Canada (SCC); the Federal Economic Development Agency for Southern Ontario (FedDev Ontario); and the Federal Economic Development Agency for Northern Ontario (FedNor).

This report details Innovation, Science and Economic Development's individual departmental actions that support the targets and/or goals of the 2019 to 2022 Federal Sustainable Development Strategy (FSDS). For information on the Government of Canada's overall progress on the targets of the FSDS, please see the FSDS Progress Report, which, per the requirements of the strengthened Federal Sustainable Development Act, is released at least once in each three year period.

1. Introduction to the Departmental Sustainable Development Strategy

The 2019 to 2022 Federal Sustainable Development Strategy (FSDS) presents the Government of Canada's sustainable development goals and targets, as required by the Federal Sustainable Development Act. In keeping with the purpose of the Act, to provide the legal framework for developing and implementing a Federal Sustainable Development Strategy that will make sustainable development decision-making more transparent and accountable to Parliament, Innovation, Science and Economic Development has developed this report to demonstrate progress in implementing its Departmental Sustainable Development Strategy.

2. Sustainable development in Innovation, Science and Economic Development

Innovation, Science and Economic Development's 2020 to 2023 Departmental Sustainable Development Strategy describes the department's actions in support of achieving clean growth, effective action on climate change, modern and resilient infrastructure, and greening government. This report presents available results for the departmental actions pertinent to these goals. Previous years' reports are posted on the Innovation, Science and Economic Development website.

This report details Innovation, Science and Economic Development's individual departmental actions that support the targets and/or goals of the 2019 to 2022 FSDS. For information on the Government of Canada's overall progress on the targets of the FSDS, please see the FSDS Progress Report, which, per the requirements of the strengthened Federal Sustainable Development Act, is released at least once in each three year period

3. Departmental performance by FSDS goal

The following tables provide performance information on departmental actions in support of the FSDS goals.

Context: Greening Government

ISED demonstrates strong leadership-by-example in greening its operations. For example, ISED is making commitments to reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions by implementing virtual collaboration tools for all of ISED's 5,500 staff, by contributing to the off-setting of employee air travel through the Greening Government Fund, and by supporting Public Services and Procurement Canada's (PSPC) green lease initiatives.

Greening Government: The Government of Canada will transition to low-carbon, climate-resilient and green operations

FSDS target(s)

FSDS contributing action(s)

Corresponding departmental action(s)

Starting point(s)

Performance indicator(s)

Target(s)

Results achieved

Contribution by each departmental result to the FSDS goal and target

Reduce GHG emissions from federal government facilities and fleets by 40% below 2005 levels by 2030 (with an aspiration to achieve this target by 2025) and 80% below 2005 levels by 2050 (with an aspiration to be carbon neutral)

All new buildings and major building retrofits will prioritize low-carbon investments based on integrated design principles, and life-cycle and total-cost-of ownership assessments which incorporate shadow carbon pricing

Shirleys Bay: Replace fluorescent lighting fixtures in Buildings 2A, 2B, 2C and 2D with LED high efficiency lighting. Footnote 1


As part of the current STS monitoring infrastructure renewal project existing STS remote monitoring facilities are being reviewed as to whether or not they will be retained, relocated to more suitable locations or permanently shutdown. Once this review has been completed any sites that STS currently owns (i.e. real property as opposed to leased sites) and that will not be relocated can be GHG baselined. Sites that will be moved can be GHG baselined a year following their relocation and those being decommissioned will need no further action with respect to GHG emissions. This review is expected to be completed by 2023-2024.

Indicator: % GHG reduction from 2005-06 baseline for facilities.

Start: 49% reduction as of 2018-19 for Shirley's Bay

Target: 40% below 2005 levels by 2030 / 80% below 2005 levels by 2050

The replacement of fluorescent light fixtures in the four listed buildings was completed and reported on in FY 2020-2021 DSDS report. No further updates to report on.

DGSO was not included in the greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions baseline for facilities (2005-06) but started to contribute to the annual reporting in 2020-21. Consequently, % of GHG reduction can only be reported starting 2022-23

DGSO continues its review to determine which spectrum monitoring sites will be shut down.

SDG 13: Climate Action

By replacing the fluorescent lighting tubes with LED light fixtures, STS-CRC has reduced its energy consumption by approximately 74.4%, directly support the goal of greening government through low-carbon retrofits.

Once completed, the review will determine which sites will be shut down, which will in turn aid in the reduction of GHG emissions from federal government facilities, directly contributing to the FSDS goal of greening government.

DSGO continues to consider alternative sources to efficiently supply part or all of its electricity from cleaner sources (e.g. renewable energy sources) and use energy-efficient lighting to support the reduction in GHG.

Fleet management will be optimized including by applying telematics to collect and analyze vehicle usage data on vehicles scheduled to be replaced

Reduce GHG emissions from ISED's fleet (MC, STS, FedNor, SIPS, CRC, OCS) 40% below 2005 levels by 2030, with an aspiration to achieve target by 2025 and 80% below 2005/06 by 2050

Equip regional offices across the country with greener, more environmentally friendly vehicles to replace older vehicles for spectrum management operations (STS-DGSO-DSMI) (where vehicles are available and where operational needs permit).

Develop a fleet management plan that will incorporate ZEV targets (STS-CRC)

Please see additional contributions under fleet management optimization Target within this Goal as well as additional contributions under the 80% ZEV fleet by 2030 Goal.

Starting point: GHG emissions from ISED's fleet in fiscal year 2005–06 base year: = 1.911 ktCO2e.

Performance indicator:

  • GHG emissions from fleet in current reporting fiscal year = [] ktCO2e.
  • Performance Indicator: [] % reduction in fleet emissions relative to 2005-06

Target: Reduce GHG emissions from ISED's fleet (MC, STS, FedNor, SIPS, CRC, OCS) 40% below 2005 levels by 2030, with an aspiration to achieve target by 2025 and 80% below 2005/06 by 2050

The GHG emissions results achieved for ISEDs fleet in 2021-22 fiscal year = 0.342 ktCO2e.

Percentage change in GHG emissions compared to fiscal year 2005-06 is a 81.8% reduction.

Note: ISEDs significant reduction in GHGs compared to previous reporting years is due to the reduced use of the fleet during the COVID 19 pandemic.

ISED Green Land Vehicle Policy requires zero emissions vehicles (ZEV's) to be purchased by default for all new vehicle purchases and requires the installation of telematic devices in all light duty fleet vehicles. In FY 2021-22, ISED had 24 vehicles equipped with telematics and acquired 80 additional telematics devices.

ISED conducts of full needs assessment in collaboration with the client Sectors, and challenges both needs assessment and underutilized vehicles.

SDG 13: Climate Action

Reducing GHG emission in ISED's fleet operations will promote a cleaner environment, help advance climate change, and achieve the FSDS targets.

SDG 13: Climate Action

Centralized vehicle acquisition process and implementation of telematic will force fleet modernization, optimization, contribute toward a cleaner environment, help advance climate change and achieve the FSDS target.

Analyze fleet operations to examine if there are opportunities to reduce the fleet size and dispose of underutilized vehicles.

Starting point: 2019 planning tool and utilization study have generated enhanced data points

Performance indicator: Fleet is assessed and underused vehicles are de-commissioned.

Target: By March 31, 2021, ISED will have assessed needs and disposed of underutilized vehicles.

Repeat annually till 2023

Our administrative fleet will be comprised of at least 80% zero-emission vehicles by 2030

Starting in 2019-2020, 100% of ISED's new light-duty administrative fleet purchases will be zero-emission vehicles (where vehicles are available and where operational needs permit).

Starting point: Total percentage of ZEVs in ISEDs light-duty administrative fleet: 3.6% (April 1, 2020)

Performance indicator: % of new light duty administrative vehicles that are ZEV

Target: 100% of ISEDs new light duty administrative vehicle purchases are ZEVs starting in 2019-2020 and every year till 2023 (where vehicles are available and where operational needs permit).

As of 2021-22, 23.7% of ISEDs light duty administrative fleet are ZEVs.

Total % of new light duty administrative ZEV's purchased in 2021-22 = 100% (1 out of 1 administrative vehicles purchased was ZEV)

ISED met this target and continues to meet the target.

SDG 13: Climate Action

Green Vehicle Policy requires sector clients to purchase ZEV's and implement telematics. The action will force fleet modernization, optimization, contribute toward a cleaner environment, help advance climate change and achieve the FSDS target.

Starting in 2020-2021 75% of new light-duty unmodified fleet vehicle purchases will be zero-emission vehicles where more than one option per vehicle class is available and considers operational feasibility.

Starting point: Total percentage of light duty unmodified ZEVs in ISEDs fleet: 1.4% (April 1, 2020)

Performance indicator: % of new light-duty unmodified ZEV purchases per year

Target: 75% of new light duty unmodified fleet vehicle purchases are ZEVs starting in 2020-2021 and until 2023 assuming vehicle class availability and operational feasibility

As of 2021-22, 6.8% of ISEDs light duty unmodified fleet are ZEV's.

Total % of new light duty unmodified ZEV's purchased in 2021-22, where more than one option per vehicle class was available= 100% (4 out of 4 light-duty unmodified fleet vehicles purchased were ZEVs)

ISED met the target and continues to meet the target.

SDG 13: Climate Action

Green Vehicle Policy requires sector clients to purchase ZEV's and implement telematics. The action will force fleet modernization, optimization, contribute toward a cleaner environment, help advance climate change and achieve the FSDS target.

Develop an approach to ensure an adequate charging infrastructure is available for ISED's current and forthcoming ZEV fleet (MC, STS, FEDNOR, SPS, CRC).

Starting point: No committee for ISED EV charging exists; currently one location within ISED has dedicated charging infrastructure for Executive vehicles only.

Performance Indicator: Engage key stakeholders and establish a committee to address charging station infrastructure.

Target: Committee is established by March 31, 2021

The Communications Research Centre Canada (CRC) Shirley's Bay Campus has: 3 dual posts and 1 single post (7 charging stations).

Quebec Region has: 1 dual post (2 charging stations)

Ontario Region has: 1 single post (1 charging station)

The charging stations at CRC are intended for its current and future fleet of EVs. The stations include point of payment, which in the future, may allow CRC the option to offer access to employees and visitors for their personal vehicles. CRC has also begun to convert its fleet to EVs by acquiring 2 EVs.

In addition to the 10 chargers identified above, ISED has 2 contracts in place for charging infrastructure (Stoney Creek, ON and Markham, ON), but these projects were not completed in FY 2021-22 due to supply chain issues. They should be completed in FY 2022-23.

ISEDs engages with key stakeholders to address charging station infrastructure.

SDG 7: Affordable and Clean Energy

SDG 9:Industry, Innovation and Infrastructure

SDG 12: Responsible Consumption and Production

SDG 13: Climate Action

The installation of a charging infrastructure at Shirleys Bay Campus allows for the use of recently acquired EVs and enables future energy efficient fleet purchases. CRC will continue to review options to convert its administrative and non-administrative fleet from internal combustion engines.

The installation of charging station infrastructure supports the transition to ZEVs, promotes a cleaner environment, help address climate change and achieve the FSDS targets

Divert at least 75% (by weight) of non-hazardous operational waste from landfills by 2030

Other

Expand the workplace eLearning tool.

By March 31, 2021, ISED will develop 1 eLearning product.

By March 31, 2022 ISED will develop a minimum of 1 additional eLearning products.

By March 31, 2023, ISED will develop a minimum of 1 additional eLearning products.

In FY 2021-22, ISED started transferring some of its e-learning tools to the Moodle Platform.

In FY 2021-22, ISED developed a two-part training course on Contracts and Procurement for SCMS.

SDG 9: Industry, Innovation and Infrastructure

All training has been held virtually since the onset of the pandemic.

Divert at least 75% (by weight) of plastic waste from landfills by 2030

Other

ISED will take action to eliminate plastics at meetings, events and when employees are on travel status.

Starting point: Meetings & Events: Information not available. Travel status: CFSPB to provide.

Performance Indicator: % of events and meetings where single-use plastics are utilized and # water bottles reimbursed for travel status per year

Target: 100% of ISED meetings and events are plastic-free by 2030. Elimination of 75% of water bottle reimbursement for travel status.

Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, most employees have been teleworking, as such very few in person meetings have occurred. In addition, travel has been very limited. Given the current context, the use of single use plastics related to ISED's operations has been close to nil. ISED is developing an internal policy to ensure that as activities pick-up, travel, events and workplace activities will be free of single use plastics.

SDG 12: Responsible consumption and production

The absence of in person meeting, and low travel activity contributes to the FSDS goal of diverting operational waste from landfills by 2030.

Other

ISED will seek to eliminate water coolers in all ISED facilities where a potable water source is accessible, and will seek for the applicable base-building management to install carbon filter water bottle filling stations (filling stations counts how many plastic bottles have been saved) in key buildings where potable water is available.

Performance indicator: # of plastic water cooler bottles saved

Target: Elimination of plastic water bottles (minimum of 75%) in the work place.

In 2020/21, 46 watercoolers (100%) within ISED space in the C.D. Howe Building were removed following the replacement of all water fountains with carbon filtered water bottle filling stations. Based on the pre-pandemic data, the removal these watercoolers would have resulted in an avoidance of 1,515 large plastic bottles being used in the water coolers annually and an associated saving of $13,281.69. (This does not reflect the pandemic low occupancy.)

Given the change above, in 2021-22, the water bottle filing stations in the C.D. Howe Building resulted in a total of 53,546 bottles avoided.

SDG 12: Responsible Consumption and Production

Eliminating plastic water coolers directly contributes to the FSDS goal to divert at least 75% of plastic waste from landfills by 2030.

Eliminate plastic pouches for employee ID cards by punching a hole in the physical ID Card – initiative completed

Performance indicator: # of plastic pouches saved

Target: Complete elimination of plastic pouches for employee ID Cards by March 2021.

Plastic pouches to hold ID cards have been eliminated as of February 2020. The need has been replaced by punching a hole in the ID card. This change has resulted in 3342 plastic pouches (100%) avoided in 2021-22

SDG 12: Responsible Consumption and Production

The removal of plastic pouches to hold ID cards directly contributes to the FSDS goal to divert at least 75% of plastic waste from landfills by 2030.

Divert at least 90% (by weight) of all construction and demolition waste from landfills (striving to achieve 100% by 2030)

Other

Construction and demolition waste (where applicable) from the decommissioning of STS remote spectrum monitoring sites will be diverted away from landfill sites where practically and economically feasible

The decommissioning of remote spectrum monitoring sites in 2021-22 resulted in 162.16 t of contaminated soil waste diverted to an accredited landfill.

A review is underway to determine which spectrum monitoring sites will be shut down. The results of the review are not yet finalized.

When STS remote spectrum monitoring sites are decommissioned, DGSO re-uses equipment and ancillary structures (e.g. antennas) or disposes of them through the PSPC crown assets disposition process

When complete, it is expected that the review will allow for sites to be decommissioned, and the accompanying equipment and ancillary structures to be recycled or disposed of through PSPC's disposition process, which will divert the construction and demolition waste from landfills, directly contributing to the FSDS goal of greening government.

As part of the STS site demolition process, requirements for diversion will be published in appropriate demolition tenders with bidders required to indicate how much waste they will be able to divert and how they will accomplish this

By 2030, 75% of domestic office lease transactions must be carbon neutral in situations where the federal government represents 75% or greater of the occupied space (square metres), market conditions permit and a competitive environment exists

In all new domestic office leases and lease renewals for space more than 500 square metres, landlords must report building energy and water usage and waste generated using EnergySTAR Portfolio Manager

In any new office leases and lease renewals awarded after April 1, 2025, where market conditions and a competitive environment exists, FedDev Ontario will give preference to buildings with the highest available EnergySTAR Portfolio Manager score.

All new domestic office leases and lease renewals awarded after April 1, 2025, where the federal government is the majority tenant, market conditions permit and a competitive environment exists, preference will be given to buildings with the highest available ENERGY STAR® Portfolio Manager score

No new office leases or lease renewals were signed in 2021-22.

SDG 11: Sustainable Cities and Communities

SDG 13: Climate Action

FedDev Ontario did not add to the carbon footprint of federal property in 2021-22 through the addition of new domestic offices.

By 2022, departments have developed measures to reduce climate change risks to assets, services and operations

Increase training and support on assessing climate change impacts, undertaking climate change risk assessments and developing adaptation actions to public service employees, and facilitate sharing of best practices and lessons learned

Develop a Business Continuity Plan that considers all hazards including climate change risks to assets, services and operations.

Starting point: In 2018-19, ISED has incorporated climate change considerations in business continuity plans.

Performance indicator: % of ISED's Business Continuity Plans include climate change considerations via an all-hazards approach

Target: 100% every year between 2020-2023

In fiscal-year 2021-22, 100% of ISED's Business Continuity Plans included climate change considerations via an all-hazards approach.

SDG 13: Climate Action

By ensuring that ISED Business Continuity Plan's include climate change considerations via an all-hazards approach, the risk of a business disruption is decreased, thus contributing to the FSDS foal for departments to develop measures to reduce climate change risks to assets, services and operations.

Use 100% clean electricity by 2025

Other

Participate in PSPC-led clean electricity purchase (CRC)

Indicator % of electricity consumption that is non-emitting

Starting: 97.10% in 2018-19

Target: 100% by 2025

Unable to report on results as PSPC is working towards contract award in the fall 2022 to meet GoC clean electricity targets

SDG 7: Affordable and Clean Energy

SDG 13: Climate Action

Replacing emitting electricity with clean reduces emissions from electricity consumption

The remote spectrum monitoring network evaluation for infrastructure renewal will examine potential methods to economically supply part or all of their electricity supply from cleaner sources.

TBD

As the majority of non-portable spectrum monitoring equipment uses electricity from conventional grid-tied sources (supplied by the local utility), DGSO does not have control over the method of power generation. Therefore, our ability to participate in reduction is limited

DSGO continues to use energy-efficient lighting to support the reduction in GHG target, however, DGSO will never achieve the 100% of electricity consumption that is non-emitting considering DGSO does not have control over the method of power generation.

Actions supporting the Goal:

Greening Government

Support for green procurement will be strengthened, including guidance, tools and training for public service employees

Incorporate environmental considerations into Employee Performance Agreements for functional heads in procurement and materiel management

Starting point: 100%

Performance indicator: # of PMAs with environmental considerations included

Target: 100% of managers and functional heads in procurement and materiel include environmental considerations in their Performance Management Agreements (PMA) from 2020-2023

100% of managers and functional heads in procurement and materials have environmental considerations in their PMAs.

SDG 9: Industry, Innovation and Infrastructure

By making the C215 training mandatory, environmental considerations have become integrated into the PMAs for procurement and material management functional heads, thusly bolstering green procurement skills across ISED and supporting the FSDS goal of greening government.

Support for green procurement will be strengthened, including guidance, tools and training for public service employees

Require all contracting and purchasing authorities to take Green Procurement Training (C215 Canada School of Public Service)

Starting point: 100% of new ISED procurement and materiel management specialists take green procurement training

Performance indicator: % of new employees who take C215 from the Canada School of Public Service (CSPS)

Target: 100%

Effective since April 1, 2006 ISED has made a strong commitment to remain compliant with the Policy on Green Procurement administered by PSPC. In 2012 the Contracting Control Framework was updated to include the mandatory requirement that all contracting officers must follow the free on-line course on Green Procurement (C215) offered by the Canada School of Public Service.

As such, 100% of new ISED procurement and material management specialists have completed the green procurement training.

SDG 9: Industry, Innovation and Infrastructure

By making the C215 training mandatory for all new procurement and material management specialists, ISED has strengthened its support for green procurement, ultimately supporting the FSDS goal of greening government.

Support for green procurement will be strengthened, including guidance, tools and training for public service employees

Providing green procurement training and guidance to employees at FedDev Ontario.

Starting Point: Over 50% of our procurement management team have completed the Canada Public Service Green Procurement Course (C215)

Performance Indicator: % of specialists in procurement and/or materiel management who have completed the Canada Public Service Green Procurement Course (C215) or equivalent

Target: 100% of our procurement management team will have completed the Canada Public Service Green Procurement Course (C215) or equivalent

100% of FedDev Ontario's procurement management team has completed the Canada Public Service Green Procurement Course (C215) or equivalent.

SDG 13: Climate Action

Support for green procurement at FedDev Ontario has been strengthened, including guidance, tools and training for public service employees. Since green procurement incorporates environmental criteria into purchasing decisions, this helps to support the FSDS goal of greening government.

Other

ISED has rolled out Microsoft Teams to all of ISED's employees while continuing to work with SSC to integrate older video conferencing tools with Microsoft Teams. The service allows employees to host and participate in virtual meetings, co-edit documents, and collaborate on projects with their peers without having to travel. Skype for Business is to be decommissioned in 2020-21. Aging teleconference phones are to be replaced with the newest Polycom Trio solution, which will provide Microsoft Teams capabilities in small and medium boardrooms. ISED will continue to release additional Office 365 tools to its users such as Live Event, Forms and Stream to improve ISED's collaboration capabilities.

Starting Point: 70% of ISED's employees actively use Microsoft Teams (June 2020)

Performance Indicator: Increase in the use of Microsoft Teams

Target: 90% by 2023

As of May 2022, 92% of ISED employees are actively using MS Teams.

Virtual Adoption learning sessions and videos are posted on MS Stream to train on new applications as they are rolled out (Forms, Mastering Meetings, M365 Features, MS Stream and Viva Insight).

Skype has been officially decommissioned.

The focus has shifted from Polycom Trios to the MS Teams softphone feature to replace aging teleconference phone. ISED is currently working with SSC on a pilot.

The Digital Office had to accelerate the deployment of MS Teams to all ISED users due to COVID-19. Because of the pandemic, this resulted in the fast adoption of the technology by ISED users. MS Teams training was offered to ISED users to facilitate the usage of the standard enterprise tool for internal and external collaboration.

We continued collaboration with our external partners to be kept informed of upcoming tools being released in order to equip our users with the latest technologies.

SDG 9: Industry, Innovation and Infrastructure

The accelerated deployment and employee adoption of this technology contributes to the greening government goal as it resulted in lowering greenhouse gas emissions as it enables employees to work from home reducing the need to commute and also by reducing the need to travel to meet external stakeholders.

The increased use of the technology is assisting ISED to meet its Future of Work objectives by reducing the department's office/space footprint. This is feasible as more employees now have the ability to enter into official teleworking arrangements, reducing the need of individually assigned offices for each employee.

Other

ISED will digitize the following files:

  • Public Service Employee Survey binder elimination
  • Staffing files (digitized since October 2019)
  • Security screening files digitized by March 31, 2021
  • Procurement/Contracting Files: Feasibility assessment underway
  • Procurement Process Modernization Initiative (PPMI) and digital signatures underway

Performance indicator: # of files digitized

Target: All files and processes are fully digital by 2021-22.

CFSPB:

100% of Procurement/ Contracting files are digitized and a tracking system was created, using MS Teams.

CMM files are created and according to the mandatory GCDocs file repository directive

HRB:

ISED did not produce any hardcopy briefing binders for the Public Service Employee Survey (PSES) in 2021-22.

As of April 1, 2021, all new staffing files continue to be created fully digital

CFSB:

Since October 2019, all new screening files follow a 100% digitized protocol.

SDG 12: Responsible Consumption and Production

SDG 13: Climate Action

Digitization of files and paper-less procedures supports greening government operations in addition to decreasing the risk of disruption in the event of natural hazards, including climate change considerations.

By developing the ISED PSES visualization tool, which digitizes the PSES results, HRB is able to provide PSES results within 24 to 48 hours (rather than 3-4 weeks). This tool motivates users to reduce printing reports and supports the Greening Government Goal.

By digitizing staffing files, HRB has reduced its use of paper and need for physical storage space. This supports the Greening Government Goal.

SDG 12: Responsible Consumption and Production

This action supports the Greening Government Goal by reducing the use of paper and associated need for physical storage space, reducing waste sent to landfills and reducing GHG emissions from waste transportation.

SDG 13: Climate Action

Digitization of files and paper-less procedures also decreases the risk of business disruption in the event of natural hazards, including climate change considerations.

Context: Clean Growth

ISED plays a strong federal leadership role in supporting clean growth and the transition to a low-carbon economy, including fostering a growing clean technology industry in Canada. ISED co-leads the Clean Growth Hub alongside Natural Resources Canada, and has mobilized a wide range of commitments to advance clean technology and make Canada the best place to start and grow a clean technology business. For example, Sustainable Development Technology Canada helps Canadian companies develop, demonstrate and deploy competitive, clean technology solutions, to help solve some of the world's most pressing environmental challenges: climate change, clean air, clean water and clean soil.

Clean Growth: A growing clean technology industry in Canada contributes to clean growth and the transition to a low-carbon economy

FSDS target(s)

FSDS contributing action(s)

Corresponding departmental action(s)

Starting point(s)

Performance indicator(s)

Target(s)

Results achieved

Contribution by each departmental result to the FSDS goal and target

Implement our Mission Innovation pledge to double federal government investments in clean energy research, development and demonstration from 2015 levels of $387 million to $775 million by 2020

The Government of Canada's five-year commitment for Mission Innovation (MI) was from fiscal year 2014-15 to 2019-20. At the time of the tabling of ISED's 2020-2023 Departmental Sustainable Development Strategy (DSDS), there were no new commitments made towards MI. ISED's 2019-2020 Departmental Results Report will include ISED's results for the final reporting year, and will also be reported to Natural Resources Canada and the International Energy Agency. ISED will support future MI commitments if they are established, and will report on those commitments in the future.

Increase the value of Canada's clean technology exports to $15.6 billion by 2025

Invest in clean technologies

Fund projects with a significant clean tech adoption or development component through the Strategic Innovation Fund (SIF)

Starting Point:

As of March 2020, 42% of SIF funded projects demonstrate a significant clean tech adoption or development component

Performance Indicators:

Percentage of projects demonstrating a significant clean tech development or adoption component

75% of SIF funded projects executed in FY 2021-22 demonstrate a significant clean tech adoption or development component.

SDG 9: Industry, Innovation and Infrastructure

FSDS: SIF application documents collect information regarding whether the project will develop a new clean technology, involve a significant clean technology adoption component, or result in other environmental benefits and GHG emission reductions. This information is then used to assess the level of environmental benefits that the project will provide for Canada. In line with Government of Canada and Departmental priorities, environmental and clean tech considerations will be increasingly considered as part of new project selection criteria in order to advance the development and sales of clean technologies.

Invest in clean technologies

Support projects with a clean tech adoption or development component through the Innovative Superclusters Initiative (ISI)

Starting Point: All five Superclusters had announced projects as of 2019

Performance Indicator:

Percentage of projects that will result in process, product, or service that reduces environmental impacts.

Performance Indicator: Percentage of funding allocated to projects that will result in process, product, or service that reduces environmental impacts

43% (134) of announced projects report environmental benefits.

53% ($303.6M) of funding has been allocated to announced projects that report environmental benefits.

Clusters can be a significant catalyst for R&D and commercialization of technologies in support of net-zero transformation and reduction of GHG emissions. Through a co-investment model where government contributions must be at least matched by industry, Clusters help to de-risk R&D, investment, and adoption of technologies, displacing incumbent technologies and making more efficient technologies more widely available, which could lead to a reduction in GHG emissions. Clusters also help Canadian companies to export into other markets, which could indirectly enabling emissions reductions elsewhere.

Invest in clean technologies

Support projects with a significant clean tech adoption or development component through the Innovative Solutions Canada (ISC) program.

ISC, together with 20 federal departments/agencies, supports the scale-up and growth of small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) by funding proposed solutions of early-stage and pre-commercial prototypes. ISC has two funding streams:

Challenge Stream: Departments and agencies have the opportunity to issue R&D challenges to address market gaps, or seek innovative solutions based on desired outcomes rather than known products or process. The Challenge stream is open to Canadian businesses with fewer than 500 employees and awards grants and R&D contracts.

Testing Stream: Competitive first-purchase stream providing the ability to test and sell pre-revenue technologies to the Government of Canada. Provides companies with an important first reference sale of their pre-commercial technology, and federal organizations access to technology with the potential to help them meet their mandates. Awards R&D contracts.

Starting Point:

ISC's Challenge Stream launched in 2017, and the former Build in Canada Innovation Program, launched in 2010, (consolidated as ISC Testing Stream in 2018), have supported the following Clean-Tech projects as of 2020:

Challenge Stream:19 clean tech challenges launched, including 14 plastics challenges; and

Testing Stream: 99 contracts awarded (20% of all contracts) for the testing of clean tech innovations, valued at over $35M

Performance Indicators:

  • % of Challenge Stream clean tech challenges that result in at least one Phase II award
  • % of Testing Stream contract awards for Clean Technology

Target:

ISC aims for 80% of Clean Technology challenges to award at least one Phase II award; and ISC aims for 20% of Testing Stream contract awards to support Clean TechnologyFootnote 2

8% (1/13) of eligible Challenge Stream tech challenges that resulted in at least one Phase 2 award in 2021-22

18% of Testing Stream contracts awarded in 2021-22 were to test Clean Technology innovations.

Companies which participate in the Challenge Stream receive funding and feedback from federal organizations to develop their technology from concept to prototype. Through the Testing Stream, companies receive an important first-reference sale and test with a federal organization. Historically, 77% of innovations which have been tested through the Testing Stream have been commercialized, with over 67% achieving successful export.

SDG 9: Industry, Innovation and Infrastructure

SDG 13: Climate Action

Funding awards provided through ISC's Challenge and Testing Stream support Canadian small and medium sized business with innovative technology to grow, scale and export their innovations—including clean technologies. This helps to advance the FSDS target to increase the value of Canada's clean technology exports.

Invest in clean technologies

Support Canadian companies in their efforts to develop and demonstrate new environmental technologies that address environmental issues such as climate change, clean air, clean water or clean soil through Sustainable Development Technology Canada's (SDTC) SD Tech Fund.

Starting point:2018/19 performance data – $144M in approvals

$93M in project funding disbursed

89% of active projects making advancements towards successful demonstrations as of the end of FY 2018-19 (March 31, 2019).

Performance indicator: Funding approved for new projects

Disbursed funding to projects

Percentage of active projects that are making advancements to successful demonstration

Target: As published in SDTC Annual Report for specified fiscal year

2019-20 Performance Targets:

Funding approved for new projects – $135M-$150M

Disbursed funding to projects – $120.7M

Percentage of active projects that are making advancements to successful demonstration – Maintain a 90% minimum average

As of March 31, 2022,

Funding approved for new projects – $176M

Disbursed funding to projects – $101M

As of the end of FY 2020-21, 97% of active projects were making advancements towards successful demonstrations.

The percentage of active projects making advancements to successful demonstration was not available at the time of reporting for the Departmental Sustainable Development Strategy Report.

SDG 9: Industry, innovation and infrastructure

SDG 13: Climate Action

By supporting Canadian companies in their efforts to develop and demonstrate new environmental technologies that address environmental issues (climate change, clean air, clean water, clean soil), SDTC's SD Tech Fund has contributed to clean economic growth and the transition to a low-carbon economy. Specifically, SDTC supported-technologies supported $3.1B in revenues in 2021-22. These technologies are reducing greenhouse gas emissions by 22.6 megatonnes of CO2 annually. Continued support will contribute to Canada's 2030 climate objectives.

 

Invest in clean technologies

FedNor will support businesses in Northern Ontario to develop and adopt clean technology solutions, and support communities to adopt and implement clean growth initiatives.

Starting point:

$1,325,157 in approvals

(FY 2018-2019)

Performance indicator: Number and value of FedNor investments in clean technology in Northern Ontario.

FedNor is supporting clean growth by investing in the transition to the green economy and clean technology product development and adoption.

In 2021-22, FedNor invested $ 1,333,837 in four clean technology projects.

This includes three Regional Economic Growth through Innovation (REGI) projects for $1,257,877 and one Northern Ontario Development Program (NODP) project for $75,960.

SDG 9: Industry, Innovation and Infrastructure

Regional developments agencies have committed to maintaining their investment levels in clean technology until 2023 to contribute to supporting Canada's Mission Innovation commitment. FedNor's investment in clean technologies is included in this effort.

Invest in clean technologies

FedDev Ontario will strategically invest in projects that: support southern Ontario firms to adopt clean technology and more productive and sustainable processes; support clean technology clusters and/or commercialization platforms; and support clean growth in communities.

Starting point: In response to the Budget 2016 mandate commitment for RDAs to double investments in clean technology to $100M per year, FedDev Ontario invested $25 million in clean technology projects in 2016-17.

Performance indicator: Number and value of FedDev Ontario investments in clean technology in southern Ontario.

Target: From 2020-2023, FedDev Ontario plans to invest approximately $25 million per year in clean technologies.

In 2021-22, FedDev Ontario invested in 46 projects with clean technology components, with a total expenditure of ~$45 million towards all project costs. ~$24 million of these expenditures were directly attributable to the clean technology components of these projects.

SDG 9: Industry, Innovation and Infrastructure

FedDev Ontario's investments in clean technology support clean growth and help contribute to increasing the value of Canada's clean technology exports through support to: southern Ontario firms to adopt clean technology and more productive and sustainable processes; clean technology clusters and/or commercialization platforms; and clean growth in communities.

Promote Canadian firms as world leaders in clean technology

The Standards Council of Canada (SCC) will continue to work with Canadian clean technology companies to help them commercialize and/or gain market access by influencing the standards development process and supporting the adoption and implementation of those standards. Support includes guiding, facilitating, funding, and collaborating with innovators to advance national and/or international standardization; exercising Canadian leadership as Secretariat of International Organization for Standardization (ISO) technical committee (TC) 207 Environmental Management; and developing conformity assessment schemes such as Environmental Technology Verification to help innovators unlock market access.

Starting point: As of March 2020, 18 clean tech standardization strategies have been advanced under SCC's 2016-2021 Innovation Program and its 2017-2022 Intellectual Property (IP) Program. SCC will measure the contributions of these programs to the Canadian clean tech sector.

Performance indicator: Number of Innovation and IP standardization strategies advanced

Target: 90 Innovation and IP standardization strategies advanced by 2022; and

Criteria agreed for how to capture a standardization strategy as contributing to clean technology by end of 2021.

SCC's clean tech activities have been supported by three pillars to help guide clean tech project identification and selection:

  • Tools for Market Transformation (e.g., biomass, sustainable finance etc.);
  • Commercialization and Regulatory Adoption (e.g., CarbonCure, FP Innovations etc.); and,
  • Environmental Performance Measurement & Verification (e.g., ETV, Questor, CORSIA, GHG, Clean Fuel)

As such, SCC's Innovation and IP Programs have advanced 90 strategies to date; criteria for identifying clean technology standardization strategies were developed.

SDG 9: Industry, innovation, and infrastructure

SDG 13: Climate action

By working with and supporting Canadian clean tech companies and helping them influence the development of National and especially International Standards, it is expected that SCC's activities will contribute to increasing the value of Canada's clean technology exports.

Collaborate with stakeholders and partners to support the growth of clean technology in Canada

Sustainable Development Technology Canada (SDTC) will continue to work closely with partners to amplify support for Canadian clean technology companies.

Starting point: For projects approved in FY 2018-19, $2.1 was leveraged in total for every $1 from SDTC.

For projects approved in FY 2018-19, $1.7 was leveraged from private sector for every $1 from SDTC.

Performance indicator:

Total dollars leveraged from all partners and collaborators relative to SD Tech Fund dollars; and

Dollars leveraged by private sector partners and collaborators.

Target:

Total dollars leveraged from all partners and collaborators relative to SD Tech Fund dollars – Maintain the $2 leverage funding for each $1 of SDTC funding.

Dollars leveraged by private sector partners and collaborators – Maintain the $1.50 leverage funding for each $1 of SDTC funding.

As published in SDTC Annual Report for specified fiscal year.

For projects approved in FY 2020-21, $2.1 leveraged in total for every $1 from SDTC. The amount of funding leveraged from all partners and collaborators for every $1 from SDTC for projects approved in FY 2021-22 was not available at the time of reporting for the Departmental Sustainable Development Strategy Report.

For projects approved in FY 2020-21, $1.8 was leveraged from private sector partners and collaborators for every $1 from SDTC

The amount of funding leveraged from all private sector collaborators for every $1 from SDTC for projects approved in FY 2021-22 was not available at the time of reporting for the Departmental Sustainable Development Strategy Report.

SDG 9: Industry, Innovation and Infrastructure

SDG 13: Climate Action

By collaborating with stakeholders and partners to support the growth of clean technology in Canada, SDTC's SD Tech Fund has leveraged its own support to amplify private and public sector financing in environmental technologies. These partnerships accelerate clean economic growth and transition to a low-carbon economy. Specifically, SDTC supported-technologies supported $3.1B in revenues in 2021-22. These technologies are reducing greenhouse gas emissions by 22.6 megatonnes of CO2 annually. Continued support will contribute to Canada's 2030 climate objectives.

Collaborate with stakeholders and partners to support the growth of clean technology in Canada

Continue to implement the Clean Growth Hub's mandate to support clean technology stakeholders navigate federal innovation programs and services

Starting point: 80%

Performance indicator:

% of public inquiries responded to within the service standard

% of scheduled calls or meetings within the service standard

% of client advisory service provided within the service standard

Target:

80% of public inquiries responded to within the service standard

80% of scheduled calls or meetings within the service standard

80% of client advisory service provided within the service standard

The Clean Growth Hub provided a prompt, reliable, and professional service to clients by exceeding its targets within the service standard: responding to 93% of public inquiries, scheduling 97% of calls or meetings, and providing 91% of client advisory service within the service standards.

SDG 9: Industry, Innovation and Infrastructure

NRCan and ISED co-lead the Clean Growth Hub to provide a single point of contact for clean technology producers and adopters, streamlining services and access to government knowledge and expertise and improving information sharing between federal departments. By helping clean technology stakeholders understand the federal system of supports and services available to them through collaborations, engagements, and consultation activities, the Clean Growth Hub supports Canada's transition to a low-carbon economy.

Collaborate with stakeholders and partners to support the growth of clean technology in Canada

The Standards Council of Canada (SCC) will continue to develop and implement national sectoral standardization strategies, as identified by Canada's Clean Technology Economic Strategy Table.

Starting point: No cohesive national standardization strategy for the clean tech sector.

Performance indicator: Number of stakeholders participating the development of a national clean tech standardization strategy;

Number of National Standards of Canada, guidance documents, and other standardization projects under development as a result of the strategy

Target: National clean tech standardization strategy is published with input from relevant stakeholders, by 2023

A draft Clean Technology Standardization Strategy was delivered to ISED in February 2020. A finalized strategy reflecting ISED comments was delivered in March 2020. SCC has incorporated some elements of the strategy into clean technology-related activities under its Innovation and IP Programs.

Since 2017, SCC's Innovation and IP Program Sector Specialists have provided guidance and advice to 36 clean tech specific stakeholders, helping them navigate the standardization system to increase the likelihood of clean tech market success (including supporting innovation, commercialization, and increasing access to international markets).

SDG 9: Industry, innovation, and infrastructure

SDG 13: Climate action

Developing strategies involves collaboration with stakeholders and partners and supports the growth of clean technology in Canada by, for example, identifying areas for standardization to expand the adoption of clean technologies and low carbon approaches.

Actions supporting the Goal: Clean Growth

This section is for actions that support the Clean Growth Goal but do not directly support a FSDS target

Develop our understanding of the clean technology landscape in Canada

Advance the administrative data component of the Clean Technology Data Strategy (CTDS) through the development of tools that would enable a more consistent approach in environmental outcomes data collection by programs that support clean technology.

Starting point:

No data collection guidance

Performance indicator:

Number of data collection protocols provided federal programs in tracking and reporting outcomes

Target:

3 data collection protocols

Clean Tech Data Guidance (protocols) covering 9 data areas was revised and, updated, to help federal programs to track and report on outcomes. Data areas included data elements required under the TBS Guidelines, total project cost, the purpose of clean tech investment, diversity data, technology readiness level, clean technology sub-sector categories, environmental benefit categories, greenhouse gas outcomes, and job outcomes.

The administrative data component also promoted other data guidance developed by federal experts on diversity and estimating greenhouse gas outcomes.

SDG 9: Industry, Innovation and Infrastructure

The Clean Technology Data Strategy aims to ensure data is available to understand the economic and environmental contribution of clean technologies in Canada. The 9 data collection guidance (protocols) and analysis helps federal programs to strengthen the evidence-base for decisions related to clean technology investment, improve Canadian's understanding of Canada's clean technology landscape, and help to ensure that policies and programs support Canada's transition to a low-carbon economy.

Develop our understanding of the clean technology landscape in Canada

Advance the authoritative data component of the Clean Technology Data Strategy (CTDS) by updating national clean technology statistics (e.g. GDP, employment, exports, etc.) in collaboration with Statistics Canada and NRCan.

Starting point: The clean technology taxonomy is the basis for the Survey of Environmental Goods and Services and is used in the Environment and Clean Technology Products Economic Account. It was last updated in 2018.

Performance indicator:

Clean technology taxonomy is updated to reflect current clean technology used throughout the Canadian economy (manufactured and imported) – ISED, NRCan and Stats Can lead

Target: Taxonomy is updated in the fall/winter of 2020 and fall of 2022

The cleantech taxonomy was updated in 2020. Changes include:

  • Certain areas were expanded with additional technologies and services to reflect emerging trends and new development. This includes the addition of carbon utilization technologies in emission control, circular design services in energy and resource efficiency, and precision sampling and data gathering technologies in sustainable forestry.
  • Specificities were added to enrich the details of certain areas. For example, hydrogen storage technologies were divided into liquid hydrogen storage and gaseous hydrogen storage to capture the nuances of the hydrogen economy.

Certain areas were updated to improve the completeness of the taxonomy. For example, corn ethanol was added to biofuel production. Although it is not a novel technology, corn ethanol was excluded in the previous version of the taxonomy, which was addressed in the 2020 update.

The cleantech taxonomy was reviewed and renewed to ensure the data collection processes at Statistics Canada capture the current cleantech activities in Canada.

While not directly contributing to the SDGs, the work underpinning the CTDS of measuring environmental and clean technology contributions to Canada's economy is essential to informing government decision-making in order to continue with its commitment to supporting clean growth. The CTDS serves as a reliable and authoritative evidence-base, critical to understanding the cleantech landscape in Canada and monitoring the progress and outcomes vis-à-vis the Government's mandate and priorities.

Develop our understanding of the clean technology landscape in Canada

Develop a robust patent search strategy to track the evolution of patented inventions by Canadian researchers and corporate institutions operating in Canada in the field of clean technologies as it aligns with the National Research Council's (NRC) Materials for Clean Fuels (MCF) Challenge Program and clean technology more broadly (as defined by the European Patent Office via its Y-Cooperative Patent Classification codes).

Starting point: Canadian Intellectual Property Office (CIPO) to develop a robust patent search strategy to identify clean technology patented inventions as it aligns with the NRC's MCF Challenge Program and tag patented inventions related to clean technologies more broadly by Canadian researchers and corporate institutions operating in Canada.

Performance indicator: Counts of patented inventions conducted by CIPO for such technologies by Canadian researchers and corporate institutions operating in Canada over specified time periods to track progress

The number of clean technology related patented inventions involving a Canadian entity in 2019Footnote * equaled 2,235.

SDG 9: Industry, Innovation and Infrastructure

Our understanding of the clean technology landscape in Canada will be improved by the development of metrics related to patented inventions in the three Materials for Clean Fuels Challenge Program themes:

  1. CO2 conversion
  2. Industrial H2

and to patented inventions in clean technology more broadly.

Support voluntary action to reduce environmental impacts

ISED will continue to implement the Computers for Schools Plus Program

Starting point:

Number of refurbished computers distributed: 69,826 (2019-2020)

Amount of toxic waste diverted from landfill: 1,265,758 lbs or 630 tons (2019–20)

Performance indicator:

Number of refurbished computers distributed.

Tonnage of computers, laptops, monitors, printers and other equipment that is reused in the refurbishment process.

TargetFootnote *:

FY 2020-21: 78,5000

FY 2021-22: 72,000

FY 2022-23: 72,000

1,300 TonsFootnote **

At year end, 50,507 devices had been distributed. The program did not achieve its target for devices distributed because of numerous shutdowns of the refurbishment centres this year due to the COVID pandemic.

Through the Connecting Families initiative, 5,041 computers were distributed to low income families in 2021-22, bringing the total distributed over the 5-year program to 48,315 devices, just under the target of 50,000 devices.

SDG 9: Industry, Innovation and Infrastructure

The Computers for Schools Plus (CFS+) program cooperates with partners across Canada to extend the useful lifespan of federal government and other donors' assets through refurbishment and redistribution to schools, libraries, not-for-profits, Indigenous communities and low-income Canadians. By extending the usable lifespan of devices, it reduces multiple impacts associated with resource extraction and energy use, including greenhouse gas reduction, solid and hazardous waste reduction, reduced air and water emissions as well as other environmental benefits, thereby reducing the environmental footprint of the federal government and it donating partners. Furthermore, where refurbishing is not feasible, the program facilitates the recycling of computers through approved recycling organizations, again reducing the use of landfill space, creating less toxic chemical emissions and encouraging the reuse of raw materials for other products, thus reducing the environmental footprint. The CFS+ program contributes to the Clean Growth target, as extending the usable lifespan of devices is the most effective way to reduce their overall impact on the environment. CFS+ is also providing computers through the Connecting Families initiative until March 2022.

 

Support skills and training in clean technology

ISED will continue to support the creation of green jobs, through the Computers for Schools Intern (CFSI) program as part of the Youth Employment and Skills Strategy (YESS)

Starting point:

Number of green jobs created: 270 (2019-20)

Performance indicator:

Number of green jobs created per fiscal year

Target:

210 per fiscalFootnote *

261 youth participated in internships in 2021-22, short of the target of 280 interns. The COVID pandemic impacted youth internships because refurbishment centres, where these youth are employed, were closed numerous times due to the safety and health of employees.

SDG 9: Industry, Innovation and Infrastructure

The Computers for Schools Intern (CFSI) program is a companion program to the Computers for Schools Plus (CFS+) program. It provides valuable internship opportunities to young Canadians by providing hands-on experience in CFS+ workshops, refurbishing devices, developing and implementing social media plans, as well as other valuable workplace skills such as teamwork and communications skills. These internships are considered "green jobs" given the role played by CFS as a reuse organization. Reuse prolongs the useful life of technology; it also reduces greenhouse gas emissions, preserves natural resources, and conserves more energy than recycling.

Support voluntary action to reduce environmental impacts

Promote the patenting of green technologies by providing for accelerated patent examination with no additional fees

Starting point: To date, a total of 376 patents have been granted by CIPO under this process (see statistics below). It is important to note that not all environmental technologies patent applicants use the green patent process, as the accelerated option may not be relevant for all companies.

Advanced examination (green technology) statistics

The total number of applications per year :

  • 2011
    • Filled: 27
    • Granted: 14
  • 2012
    • Filled: 69
    • Granted: 44
  • 2013
    • Filled: 80
    • Granted: 61
  • 2014
    • Filled: 90
    • Granted: 71
  • 2015
    • Filled: 69
    • Granted: 54
  • 2016
    • Filled: 69
    • Granted: 57
  • 2017
    • Filled: 63
    • Granted: 50
  • 2018
    • Filled: 52
    • Granted: 23
  • 2019
    • Filled: 39
    • Granted: 2
  • Total
    • Filled: 558
    • Granted: 376
  • Average per year
    • Filled: 62
    • Granted: 42

Note: The chart above is not a trend line chart. In each year-line, the numbers reflect the number of green patents filed in that year and green patents that were filed in that year that went on to become patents.

Performance indicator: Number of patent applications that have been granted accelerated examination under the green patent process.

CIPO: Advanced Examination for Green Technologies

Results achieved for 2021-2022:

In 2021-22, 65 patent applications were accorded green status for accelerated examination and 49 green patent applications were granted under the patent process related to green technology.

SDG 12: Responsible Consumption and Production

The Advanced Examination for Green Technologies allows for faster patent application examination at no extra cost for technologies that help resolve or mitigate environmental impacts or conserve the natural environment and natural resources. By reducing the time to obtain a patent, inventors can bring "green" technology to market sooner.

Collaborate with international partners in the transition to clean energy, low-carbon future

Collaborate with the World Intellectual Property Organization (WIPO) GREEN network to promote innovation and the diffusion of green technologies.

Starting point: 4 Canadian technologies uploaded onto WIPO GREEN database (2017-2019)

Performance indicator: Number of Canadian technologies uploaded onto the WIPO GREEN database.

Results achieved for 2021-2022:

6 new technologies have been uploaded to the WIPO GREEN Database in 2021-22

SDG 17: Partnership to achieve the Goal

FSDS: By collaborating with WIPO GREEN, CIPO will contribute to clean growth by buttressing the Canadian clean technology presence in the WIPO GREEN network and connecting Canadians to the WIPO GREEN network. The WIPO GREEN network facilitates commercial relationships and transactions by connecting green technology providers and seekers through its online database and matchmaking initiatives – all part of its mission to catalyze green tech innovation and accelerate green tech transfer and diffusion.

Support skills and training in clean technology

Continue to fund and support third party organizations such as Mitacs, who advance work-integrated learning opportunities focussed on innovative research and development, including investments in clean technologies.

Starting point:

2019-20

732 internships and fellowships in clean technology supported by Mitacs as a result of ISED funding

Performance indicator:

Number of internships supported

1,482 internships and fellowships in clean technology supported by Mitacs in 2021-22

This contributes to the FSDS goal by supporting skills development in innovative research and development in clean technologies.

 

Support skills and training in clean technology

Increase the awareness and effective use of intellectual property (IP) by Canadian innovators and businesses through targeted IP literacy initiatives.

Starting point: IP Awareness metrics (source: 2017 SME Financing and Growth Survey; CIPO IP in Canada Report 2019 – Figure 15)
Note: these are not clean technology specific

  • 59% of SMEs in Canada are at least slightly aware of patents
  • 65% of SMEs in Canada are at least slightly aware of trademarks
  • 28% of SMEs in Canada are at least slightly aware of industrial designs
  • 37% of SMEs in Canada are at least slightly aware of trade secrets
  • Overall 73% of SMEs in Canada are at least slightly aware of IP

IP Use (source: 2017 SME Financing and Growth Survey; CIPO IP in Canada Report 2019 – Figure 15)
Note: these are not clean technology specific

  • 2% of SMEs in Canada use patents
  • 9% of SMEs in Canada use trademarks
  • 1% of SMEs in Canada use industrial designs
  • 5% of SMEs in Canada use trade secrets

Performance indicator:

The Program's outreach metrics:

  • Number of seminars and webinars
  • Number of events attended
  • Number of one-on-one meetings with SMEs

Results achieved for 2021-2022:

  • Number of seminars and webinars targeting Clean Tech companies – 5
  • Number of Clean Tech themed events attended – 2
  • Number of one-on-one meetings with Clean Tech SMEs – 35

SDG 9: Industry, Innovation and Infrastructure

SDG 17: Partnerships for the Goals

CIPO promotes IP literacy in Canada through our IP Awareness and Education

Program. Through this program, CIPO supports efforts to raise awareness of specialized resources for clean technology businesses and how they may leverage intellectual property (IP) as part of their business and growth strategy.

Other

Use social media and other public outreach tools (e.g. guidance messages) to proactively raise awareness about greenwashing and promote compliance with the Competition Act, the Consumer Packaging and Labelling Act, and the Textile Labelling Act.

Starting point: The Competition Bureau uses traditional enforcement and public outreach to inform Canadian consumers about greenwashing and business about their obligations under the Competition Act.

Performance indicator: The number of environmentally-related social media posts published by the Competition Bureau. The number of guidance messages or alerts posted on the Competition Bureau's website.

Target: Increase in the amount of public outreach (e.g. social media posts) on greenwashing during the campaign.

For fiscal year 2021-22, 12 social media posts were published in English and French, on the Competition Bureau social media platforms Twitter, Facebook and LinkedIn. In comparison, one social media post was published on all platforms during the previous fiscal year.

Details of media posts published in 2021-2022:Bamboo (April 22, 2021), World Environment Day (June 4, 2021), ICPEN summary (June 29, 2021), Keurig settlement (January 6 and 7, 2022), consumer alert (January 26 and 28), trivia (February 16), #ThursdayThoughts/tips (February 17), alert refresh (February 17), Global Recycling Day (March 18) and World Water Day (March 22).

A new webpage about environmental claims and greenwashing published by the Competition Bureau on November 4, 2021.

Published the announcement of a settlement between the Bureau and Keurig Canada Inc. related to environmental claims on January 6, 2022.

A consumer alert entitled "Be on the lookout for greenwashing" published by the Competition Bureau on January 26, 2022.

Increase awareness among Canadian citizens and businesses about greenwashing; false and misleading or unsubstantiated claims.

Support voluntary action to reduce environmental impacts

ISED's Office of Consumer Affairs will promote sustainable consumption practices by continuing to work with key partners to ensure that consumers have the information and tools needed to protect their interests.

Starting point: The Office of Consumer Affairs partnered with Environment and Climate Change Canada (ECCC) to update and create new web content for consumers on how to Be a green consumer, which went live in December 2019. As such, 2020-2021 will be the baseline year for reporting.

Performance indicator: Number of visitors accessing information about sustainable consumption, on Innovation, Science and Economic Development Canada's website and other websites ISED maintains.

The total number of visitors to ISED's sustainable consumption pages for FY 2021-2022 was 10,593 (from 10,519 in 2020-2021).

SDG 12: Responsible Consumption and Production

By providing information on how consumers can make safe and eco-friendly choices when participating in the marketplace, the Office of Consumer Affairs is encouraging Canadians who access its web offerings to consume products and services in a way that is sustainable. Thus, supporting voluntary action to reduce environmental impacts.

Context: Effective Action on Climate Change

Drawing on its innovation programming, science funding, policy and industry expertise, and regulatory functions, ISED continues to play a leadership role in the federal action against climate change. ISED recognizes the importance of accelerating the transition to a low-carbon, inclusive, clean growth economy. For example, as the federal lead for the "Clean Technology, Innovation and Jobs" pillar of the Pan-Canadian Framework on Clean Growth and Climate Change, ISED supports businesses and Canadians at all points on the innovation continuum—from early research and development, to full commercialization. ISED strives to make Canada the best place to start and grow a clean technology business, as it aims to help advance the Government's target of being a net-zero GHG emissions economy by 2050.

Effective Action on Climate Change: A low-carbon economy contributes to limiting global average temperature rise to well below two degrees Celsius and supports efforts to limit the increase to 1.5 degrees Celsius
FSDS target(s) FSDS contributing action(s) Corresponding departmental action(s) Starting point(s)
Performance indicator(s)
Target(s)
Results achieved Contribution by each departmental result to the FSDS goal and target

By 2030, reduce Canada's total GHG emissions by 30%, relative to 2005 emission levels

Develop a solid base of scientific research and analysis on climate change

Continue to fund and support third-party science and research organizations (TPOs) in Canada working on climate change, including on resilience, mitigation and adaptation efforts (organizations include Genome Canada and Canadian Institutes for Advanced Research).

Starting points:

Genome Canada: In 2018-19, there were 38 active multi-year climate change-related genomics research projects based in Canadian universities awarded a total of $64,792,618 from Genome Canada, which leveraged $141,765,207 from other sources

Canadian Institutes for Advanced Research (CIFAR): For 2018-19, CIFAR invested $1.23M of the ISED contribution in its Bio-inspired Solar Energy research program which has leveraged an additional $605,000 from other sources

Performance indicator:

Annual number or value of research activities related to climate change supported by third-party research organizations funded by ISED

Genome Canada:

In 2021-22, there were 90 active multi-year climate change-related genomics research projects based in Canadian universities awarded a total of $122,742,209M from Genome Canada, which leveraged $251,183,864M from other sources, for a total investment of $373,926,073M.

CIFAR: The Bio-inspired Solar Energy research program held 3 meetings in 2021-22. Program interactions supported the publication of new research in subjects including how nature sequesters and transforms carbon and how solar-driven reactions can transform chemical manufacturing; for example through efficient electrolysis in carbon capture solutions. CIFAR also provided 1 Catalyst Grant award to study biomimetic carbonic anhydrase molecules for electrochemical CO2 capture and conversion. If successful, this research would demonstrate for the first time integrated electrochemical CO2 capture and conversion using bio-inspired catalysts.

Genome Canada:

Genome Canada supports genomics research that help advance climate change mitigation and adaptation, including: greener energy and biomaterials to minimize the environmental impact of the natural resource sector, and the identification and enhanced breeding/planting of more resilient, sustainable and productive organisms/crops and forests to protect against climate change.

CIFAR:

This program examines the biological, physical, and chemical lessons of photosynthetic organisms to create better ways of harvesting, transporting, and storing light energy. This research has the future potential to lead to the creation of sustainable fuels using biological processes like photosynthesis.

Support businesses and Canadians in taking action to reduce greenhouse gas emissions (GHG)

Fund the development and/or adoption of technologies to reduce greenhouse gas emissions through the Strategic Innovation Fund's (SIF) Net-Zero Accelerator Fund

Starting Point:

SIF is introducing new requirements for project-level GHG estimation (2021), and will provide a baseline and target next year (2022) for estimated annual reductions in GHG emissions from SIF-funded projects.

Performance Indicators:

Once the project level GHG estimation requirement is introduced, SIF will be able to determine the annual estimated reductions in GHG emissions from SIF-funded projects (on/around November 2022)

In 2021-22, SIF executed contribution agreements with two companies, Algoma Steel and Arcelor Mittal Dofasco. These two projects have announced estimated GHG reductions commitments of 6Mt annually by 2030.

SDG 9: Industry, Innovation and Infrastructure

FSDS: To support businesses in taking action to reduce greenhouse gas emissions, SIF's Net Zero Accelerator initiative will fund clean technology development and adoption projects, including near-term decarbonization projects with large industrial emitters; clean technology development and adoption projects in the aerospace and automobile sectors; projects that support the development of a battery innovation and industrial ecosystem; as well as promising clean technology projects from any sector.

Support businesses and Canadians in taking action to reduce greenhouse gas emissions

Strategic Innovation Fund (SIF) clients commit to greenhouse gas reduction targets in their Sustainability Plans.

Starting Point:

As of March 2020, 14% of SIF funded projects commit to reducing greenhouse gas emissions by recipient companies. This accounts for 12% of total SIF contributions.

Performance Indicator:

Percentage of projects (and associated percentage of SIF contributions) that commit to reducing greenhouse gas emissions by recipient companies.

Of the 16 agreements finalized by the program, two large-scale SIF funded projects executed in FY 2021-22 commit to reducing greenhouse gas emissions, and accounting for over a third of total SIF contributions for this fiscal year.

SDG 9: Industry, Innovation and Infrastructure

FSDS: To support businesses taking action to reduce GHG emissions, SIF recipients will be required to develop a Sustainability Plan which will include concrete commitments around improving environmental sustainability outcomes, including addressing GHG reductions.

Zero-emission vehicles will represent 10% of new light-duty vehicle sales by 2025, 30% by 2030 and 100% by 2040

Work with partners on climate change

Innovation, Science and Economic Development Canada (ISED), along with Transport Canada, co-lead Canada's approach to increasing the production of zero-emission vehicles (ZEV).

Starting point: October 2020 commitments to invest in ZEV manufacturing, building on Budget 2019 commitments to work with automotive manufacturers to increase ZEVs.

Performance indicator:

Investments and business decisions are identified in collaboration with industry to increase adoption of ZEVs in Canada.

Target: Investments and business decisions are identified in collaboration with industry to increase production of ZEVs in Canada.

ISED launched a mines to mobility initiative to develop a Canadian battery supply chain to support zero-emission vehicle manufacturing mandates in Canada. 2021-2022 was a significant year for implementation. The Department worked proactively with industry, provinces and territories, and stakeholders to target strategic anchor investments. Building a Canadian Industrial and Innovation Battery Ecosystem

Results Achieved 2021-22

  • 45 – Interested Companies Assessed
  • 3 – Number of new announced anchor investments
  • 3 – Industry presentations
  • 1 – Industry Roundtable 2021-22
  • 100% Percentage of necessary Cabinet and Treasury Board approvals acquired

Zero-emission vehicle adoption is a key approach to reducing Canada's overall greenhouse gas emissions. ISED works with other government departments such as Transport Canada, Environmental and Climate Change Canada, and Natural Resources Canada to support the transformation of the industry towards electrification, and is making strategic investments to promote low and zero-emission vehicle production through the Strategic Innovation Fund.

Support businesses and Canadians in taking action to reduce greenhouse gas emissions

Subject to an increase of targeted funding, Measurement Canada in collaboration with other departments is involved in the Zero-Emission Vehicle Strategy, will develop its technical expertise for the approval of new trade measurement technologies as well as implement a new inspection program for these devices to protect the interest of all Canadians.

Starting point: Fall 2020 initiating Measurement Canada preliminary planning and technical needs for approval and inspection of ZEV measuring devices.

Performance indicator: Number of trade measurement charging and refuelling devices approved in Canada.

Number of compliant trade measurement charging and refuelling devices in Canadian marketplace.

Targets: To be determined based on funding and success of ZEV programs (Federal, Provincial) and deployment of ZEV into the Canadian marketplace.

Measurement Canada is currently engaged in consultations as part of the introduction of technical requirements aligned with international development work and stakeholder feedback, and in the evaluation of test equipment for device type approvals and inspections of EV charging devices. Once this work is completed, Measurement Canada will be able to approve and inspect EV charging stations.

Measurement Canada's device type approvals and inspections of EV charging stations will protect Canadians and their confidence in the marketplace by establishing minimum levels of accuracy and compliance to which all EV charging station operators must comply.

Actions supporting the Goal:

Effective Action on Climate Change

This section is for actions that support the Effective Action on Climate Change Goal but do not directly support a FSDS target

Develop a solid base of scientific research and analysis on climate change

Continue to fund third-party science and research organizations in Canada, such as the Canada Foundation for Innovation (CFI), that support climate change and environmental sustainability goals

Starting point:

2019: 228 projects funded by CFI reported at least one environmental benefit

Performance indicator:

Annual number of CFI-funded projects reporting at least one environmental benefit, including climate change

2021: 190 projects funded by CFI reported at least one environmental benefit

Continuing to provide funding to third party organizations that contributes to scientific research related to climate change and environmental sustainability furthers the Government of Canada's effective actions on climate change. With this financial contribution, the CFI is able to fund research in areas such as the following that resulted in environmental and sustainability benefits:

  • In 2017, the CFI provided $150,000 to York University to support the innovative Water Technologies for Energy Research (iWaTER) laboratory that seeks to develop renewable energies and smart water technology. In 2020-21, iWaTER reported that the infrastructure contributed to the development of new bioprocesses used to convert methane into products such as bioplastic and methanol that will allow industrial companies to reduce their carbon footprint and greenhouse gas emissions.

Context: Modern and Resilient Infrastructure

ISED continues to play a leadership role in supporting sustainable and resilient infrastructure in Canada, building on existing partnerships with the private sector, provinces, territories, municipalities, Indigenous communities, and official language minority communities. For example, within ISED's portfolio, the Standards Council of Canada (SCC) works to modernize Canadian infrastructure to improve resilience to climate change and environmental performance. SCC will continue to fund and facilitate the development and updating of standards, guidance and tools, and pursue other standardization-related projects in this area.

Unselect

Modern and Resilient Infrastructure: Modern, sustainable, and resilient infrastructure supports clean economic growth and social inclusion
FSDS target(s) FSDS contributing action(s) Corresponding departmental action(s) Starting point(s)
Performance indicator(s)
Target(s)
Results achieved Contribution by each departmental result to the FSDS goal and target

By the end of 2027-28 fiscal year, invest $26.9 billion in funding for green infrastructure initiatives that reduce greenhouse gas emissions and improve climate resilience and environment quality

Support low-carbon, resilient infrastructure

The Standards Council of Canada (SCC) will continue to fund and facilitate the development and updating of standards, guidance, and tools, and pursue other standardization-related projects, to improve the climate resilience and environmental performance of Canadian infrastructure.

Starting point: As of May 2020, 41 standards, guidance, and other standardization strategies have been developed under SCC's 2016-2021 Standards to Support Resilience in Infrastructure Program.

Performance indicator: Number of additional standards, guidance, and other standardization strategies developed.

Target:

3 additional standards, guidance, or other standardization strategies developed by 2021

As of March 2022, 41 standards, guidance documents, and other standardization strategies have been developed under SCC's 2016-2021 Standards to Support Resilience in Infrastructure Program (SSRIP). A final program report capturing lessons learned, and next steps will be published by the end of FY 2022-2023.

The first phase of the SSRIP has now sunset. A second, phase (2021-2026) of the SSRIP has begun which will see an additional 36 standards, guidance documents and other standardization strategies developed to support climate resilient infrastructure.

SCC also contributed significantly to the Roadmap to Net-Zero Cement and Concrete (to be published mid 2022) to ensure codes and standards were well considered. The Roadmap was led by the Cement Association of Canada in partnership with ISED.

SDG 9: Industry, innovation, and infrastructure

SDG 11: Sustainable cities and communities

Funding and facilitating new and updated standards, guidance, roadmaps, and other tools to reflect current and expected climate change trends represents a direct investment in Canada's knowledge base to support low-carbon and climate-resilient infrastructure.

Other

ISED will continue to deliver programs that support projects to bring reliable, high-speed Internet to Canadians, especially in more rural and remote areas, to help businesses grow, create new jobs and connect more people to the resources, services and information they need to build a better future.

Starting point:

In 2019, 87.4% of Canadian households had access to minimum Internet speeds of 50/10 Mbps (CRTC)

Performance indicator:

Percentage of Canadian households with access to

minimum Internet speeds of 50/10 Mbps

Targets:

98% of Canadian households will have access to minimum Internet speeds of 50/10 Mbps by December 31, 2026 (and 100% by 2030)

By the end of 2020, 89.7% of Canadian households had access to minimum Internet speeds of 50/10 Mbps (CRTC, Communications Market Report).

Through government-funded broadband programs, as well as other public and private investment, the government is on track to meet its target of 98% of households connected by 2026 and 100% by 2030.

ISED's broadband programs (including the Universal Broadband Fund ($2.75 billion), Connect to Innovate ($585 million) and a Low Earth Orbit (LEO) satellite investment) fund modern and resilient infrastructure, which supports clean economic growth. These investments allow the use of Internet-enabled technologies in rural and remote communities, which reduces greenhouse gas emissions through energy efficiency, smart metering, and reducing commuting through telework, e-health and distance education.

ISED's broadband funding programs account for the impacts of climate change by ensuring that costs associated with building resilient networks are eligible for program funding, and that network resiliency is included in a project's design. Resilient designs incorporate features such as power backup, redundant fibre, redundant equipment and more. Satellite services such as LEO can also play an important role in providing short-term backup or redundant connections to areas where on-the-ground networks may be damaged through climate-induced disasters.

ISED's broadband funding programs also improve social inclusion by ensuring that people are able to connect to the resources and services they need, and to fully participate in the digital world.

4. Report on integrating sustainable development

Innovation, Science and Economic Development will continue to ensure that its decision-making process includes consideration of FSDS goals and targets through its strategic environmental assessment (SEA) process. A SEA for a policy, plan or program proposal includes an analysis of the impacts of the given proposal on the environment, including on relevant FSDS goals and targets.

Public statements on the results of Innovation, Science and Economic Development 's assessments are made public when an initiative that has undergone a detailed SEA. The purpose of the public statement is to demonstrate that the environmental effects, including the impacts on achieving the FSDS goals and targets, of the approved policy, plan or program have been considered during proposal development and decision-making.